In this Book

summary

Connections between Brazil and the Middle East have a long history, but the importance of these interactions has been heightened in recent years by the rise of Brazil as a champion of the global south, mass mobilizations in the Arab world and South America, and the cultural renaissance of Afro-descendant Muslims and Arab ethnic identities in the Americas. This groundbreaking collection traces the links between these two regions, describes the emergence of new South-South solidarities, and offers new methodologies for the study of transnationalism, global culture, and international relations.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title page, Copyright
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. v-vi
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. vii-x
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  1. Introduction
  2. Paul Amar
  3. pp. 1-14
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  1. Part One. South-South Relations, Security Politics, Diplomatic History
  2. pp. 15-16
  1. 1. The Middle East and Brazil: Transregional Politics in the Dilma Rousseff Era
  2. Paul Amar
  3. pp. 17-38
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  1. 2. The Summit of South America–Arab States: Historical Contexts of South-South Solidarity and Exchange
  2. Paulo Daniel Elias Farah, Translated by Katia Costa-Santos
  3. pp. 39-56
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  1. 3. Brazil’s Relations with the Middle East in the “Oil Shock” Era: Pragmatism, Universalism, and Developmentalism in the 1970s
  2. Carlos Ribeiro Santana, Translated by Bianca Brigidi
  3. pp. 57-74
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  1. 4. Palestine-Israel Controversies in the 1970s and the Birth of Brazilian Transregionalism
  2. Monique Sochaczewski, Translated by Bianca Brigidi
  3. pp. 75-91
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  1. 5. Terrorist Frontier Cell or Cosmopolitan Commercial Hub? The Arab and Muslim Presence at the Border of Paraguay, Brazil, and Argentina
  2. pp. 92-116
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  1. Part Two. Race, Nation, and Transregional Imaginations
  2. pp. 117-118
  1. 6. Tropical Orientalism: Brazil’s Race Debates and the Sephardi-Moorish Atlantic
  2. Ella Shohat and Robert Stam
  3. pp. 119-161
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  1. 7. Slave Barracks Aristocrats: Islam and the Orient in the Work of Gilberto Freyre
  2. Alexandra Isfahani-Hammond
  3. pp. 162-181
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  1. 8. Islamic Transnationalism and Anti-Slavery Movements: The Malê Rebellion as Debated by Brazil’s Press, 1835–1838
  2. José T. Cairus, Translated by Eduardo Viana da Silva
  3. pp. 182-198
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  1. 9. A Transnational Intellectual Sphere: Brazil and Its Middle Eastern Populations
  2. María del Mar Logroño Narbona
  3. pp. 199-214
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  1. 10. The Politics of Anti-Zionism and Racial Democracy in Homeland Tourism
  2. John Tofik Karam
  3. pp. 215-227
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  1. 11. Rio de Janeiro’s Global Bazaar: Syrian, Lebanese, and Chinese Merchants in the Saara
  2. Neiva Vieira da Cunha and Pedro Paulo Thiago de Mello, Translated by Silvia C. Ferreira
  3. pp. 228-240
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  1. 12. Muslim Identities in Brazil: Engaging Local and Transnational Spheres
  2. Paulo Gabriel Hilu da Rocha Pinto
  3. pp. 241-256
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  1. Part Three. Literature and Transregional Media Cultures
  2. pp. 257-258
  1. 13. Telenovelas and Muslim Identities in Brazil
  2. Silvia M. Montenegro, Translated by Anneliese Pollock
  3. pp. 259-278
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  1. 14. Turco Peddlers, Brazilian Plantationists, and Transnational Arabs: The Genre Triangle of Levantine-Brazilian Literature
  2. Silvia C. Ferreira
  3. pp. 279-295
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  1. 15. Multiple Homelands: Heritage and Migrancy in Brazilian Mahjari Literature
  2. pp. 296-307
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  1. 16. Orientalism in Milton Hatoum’s Fiction
  2. Daniela Birman, Translated by Silvia C. Ferreira
  3. pp. 308-321
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  1. 17. Arab-Brazilian Literature: Alberto Mussa’s Mu‘allaqa and South-South Dialogue
  2. Waïl S. Hassan
  3. pp. 322-336
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  1. Contributors
  2. pp. 337-340
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 341-355
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Additional Information

ISBN
9780253014962
Print ISBN
9780253012234
MARC Record
OCLC
908146090
Pages
366
Launched on MUSE
2016-01-01
Language
English
Open Access
N
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