Cover

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Title page, Copyright

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Contents

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List of Illustrations

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pp. vii-viii

Acknowledgments

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p. ix

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Introduction

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pp. 1-10

On July 4, 1835, the day John Sanderson (1783–1844) set foot in Paris for the first time, the street noise so overwhelmed him that he felt that Paris was “ahead of [his] experience”:
As for the noise of the streets, I need not attempt to describe it. What idea can ears, used only...

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Chapter 1. Aural Flânerie: The Flâneur in the City as Concert

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pp. 11-34

Nineteenth-century urban experience often is apprehended through the figure of the flâneur. The flâneur is a mythic type that emerges in the late eighteenth century in urban sketches and panoramas such as Louis-Sébastien Mercier’s Tableau de Paris and persists in the work of nineteenth-century writers...

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Chapter 2. Blason Sonore: Street Cries in the City

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pp. 35-60

For nineteenth-century ears, street cries had always defined the ambiance of Paris. From the Middle Ages through to the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, street cries were used by hawkers to publicize announcements or news and to sell merchandise of all kinds. Peddlers...

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Chapter 3. Sonic Classifications in Haussmann’s Paris

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pp. 61-81

The Paris we know today is the result of profound urban renovations directed by Baron Georges-Eugène Haussmann, prefect of the Seine under the Second Empire. Commissioned by Napoléon III, Haussmann extended the work of his predecessors and redrew the city following a rationally designed...

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Chapter 4. Listening to the Glazier’s Cry

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pp. 82-104

As attentive listeners to street noise, as well as observers of spectacles on the boulevards, nineteenth-century French poets were keenly attuned to the transformations of the sonic ambiance of Paris by the prefects of the Seine, especially Baron Haussmann. They listened to the ways in which...

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Chapter 5. “Cry Louder, Street Crier”: Peddling Poetry and the Avant-Garde

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pp. 105-128

“Le Bruit” by the avant-garde poet Georges Lorin records the intensity of city noise in Paris where loud coachmen, carts, animals, and street musicians assail the flâneur-poet, but instead of toning down this clamor to render the city as harmonious concert, Lorin, following Charles Baudelaire...

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Conclusion

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pp. 129-138

One hundred and twenty-five years after the publication of Les Types de Paris, in another time and place, you can still hear the jingle of street vendors peddling their services. As I drafted this conclusion in Montreal’s Mile End neighborhood, I was struck by surprise when I heard the amplified...

Notes

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pp. 139-166

Works Cited

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pp. 167-182

Index

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pp. 183-198