Cover

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Title page, Series page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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List of Tables

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pp. xi-xii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xiii-xvi

This book has been a long labor of love sixteen years in the making, and it would not have been possible without the many people who helped it come to fruition. First, I want to thank my family for their unconditional love and support. From the childhood vacations spent at historic sites...

List of Abbreviations

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pp. xvii-xx

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Introduction

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pp. 1-14

In 1745, Governor Edward Trelawny of Jamaica published a controversial pamphlet entitled An Essay Concerning Slavery. Much to the consternation of his constituents, he wrote, “I cou’d wish with all my Heart, that Slavery was abolish’d entirely, and I hope in time it may be so.” Unlike...

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1. “To so dark a destiny My lovely babe I’ve borne”: Slavery and Childhood in Jamaica in the Age of Abolition

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pp. 15-38

In his controversial pamphlet entitled An Essay Concerning Slavery, Governor Edward Trelawny wrote in 1745, “It is notorious that in most Plantations more die than are born there.” To illustrate his point he created a fictional dialogue between an officer and a Jamaican planter in...

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2. “The child whom many fathers share, Hath seldom known a father’s care”: Miscegenation and Childhood in Jamaican Slave Society

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pp. 39-59

In 1764, an unnamed slave woman belonging to the Clarendon parish rectory gave birth to a daughter she named and baptized Molly Matthews. According to parish rectors, Molly was the reputed daughter of a white man named David Matthews. Four years later, David Matthews...

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3. “Train up a child in the way he should go”: Childhood and Education in the Jamaican Slave Community

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pp. 60-78

In 1798, Reverend Rees of Kingston preached a sermon on the advantages of the religious socialization of children “both to themselves and to the community.” Quoting Proverbs 22:6, Rees argued that every slave owner in Jamaica should take complete responsibility in raising the enslaved...

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4. “That iniquitous law”: The Apprenticeship and Emancipation of Jamaica’s Enslaved Children

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pp. 79-96

In November 1836, Stephen Hannaford, owner of several properties in the parish of St. Dorothy, petitioned the Jamaican Assembly for economic support for an orphaned infant on Top Hill Estate. For months Hannaford had supported the infant after the child’s mother, an apprentice...

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Conclusions

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pp. 97-102

Every moment of change has a catalyst. Throughout my discussion of the changing nature of childhood in Jamaica, the English abolitionist movement has been the main spark for that change. Prior to the ameliorative laws of 1788, enslaved children were nothing but a financial burden...

Notes

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pp. 103-124

References

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pp. 125-148

Index

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pp. 149-153