Cover

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Title page, Copyright, Editorial series

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Iberia and the Mediterranean: An Introduction

Michelle M. Hamilton, Núria Silleras-Fernández

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pp. ix-xxvii

In the last decade or so Mediterranean studies has gone from constituting a rather vague approach to a region imagined in geographical terms, to coalescing as a recognized field of research and teaching—a process driven in part by its inherent imperative to interrogate established categories of cultural and...

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1. Christian-Muslim-Jewish Relations, Medieval “Spain,” and the Mediterranean: An Historiographical Op-Ed

Brian A. Catlos

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pp. 1-16

For those who have worked on the history and culture of medieval Spain over the last half-century, and particularly on the subject of Muslim-Christian-Jewish relations, it is has been difficult to escape the influence of Américo Castro and Claudio Sánchez-Albornoz. These two towering figures defined...

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2. The Role of Jews, Muslims, and Christians in Iberia in the Transmission of Knowledge about Islam to the Western World: A Comparative Perspective

Gerard Wiegers

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pp. 17-28

The Mediterranean region, and especially Christian Iberia, is well known as the region par excellence in which during the medieval and early modern period the transmission of knowledge from the Islamicate world to the “Christian” world took place.1 Twelfth-century Toledo and Sicily, for example...

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3. The Princess and the Palace: On Hawwa’ bint Tashufin and Other Women from the Almoravid Royal Family

Manuela Marín

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pp. 29-48

Almoravids (Arab. Al-Murabitun) ruled over the Islamic West—the Maghrib and al-Andalus—during the second half of the eleventh century and the first half of the twelfth century.1 Of Saharian Berber origins (Sanhaja), Almoravids unified the Maghrib and the Iberian Peninsula for the first time since the arrival...

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4. Medieval Mediterranean Travel as an Intellectual Journey: Seafaring and the Pursuit of Knowledge in the Libro de Apolonio

Nicholas M. Parmley

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pp. 49-74

The Libro de Apolonio has a rich and complicated history, both pagan and Christian, that stretches from the second century to the thirteenth century A.D. and from Asia Minor to the Kingdom of Aragon in the northeast of the Iberian Peninsula.1 The thirteenth-century Castilian version of the story of Apolonio...

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5. Between the Seas: Apolonio and Alexander

Simone Pinet

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pp. 75-98

It must come as no small surprise to anthropologists or historians that literary scholars have only recently decided to embrace the Mediterranean as an analytical category. Not only has the term been debated and criticized for decades in those fields, it actually seems to have run its productive course...

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6. The Catalan Standard Language in the Mediterranean: Greece versus Sardinia in Muntaner’s Crònica

Vicente Lledó-Guillem

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pp. 99-118

The Crònica by Ramon Muntaner (c. 1270–1336) is considered one of the best examples of linguistic patriotism in the Middle Ages, particularly with regard to Catalan language and identity.1 The author narrates the history of the Crown of Aragon from the birth of Jaume I (1207) to the coronation of Alfons...

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7. Empire in the Old World: Ferdinand the Catholic and His Aspiration to Universal Empire, 1479–1516

Andrew W. Devereux

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pp. 119-142

It is well known that Christopher Columbus sought to reach India by way of the Atlantic, and that he viewed his voyages as potentially instrumental in Spain attaining a position of economic and political primacy among the polities of Europe.1 While attempting to discover a westerly route to the riches...

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8. Singing the Scene of History in Fernão Lopes

Josiah Blackmore

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pp. 143-156

When the Portuguese king Fernando I died in late 1383, there ensued a series of events over the next two years that marked, in A.R. Disney’s phrasing, “the greatest dynastic crisis in Portugal since the kingdom had come into being” (117). The heir to the throne, Fernando’s daughter Beatriz, was only...

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9. The Most marueilous historie of the Iewes: Historiography and the “Marvelous” in the Sixteenth Century

Eleazar Gutwirth

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pp. 157-182

A compendious and most marueilous history of the latter times of the Iewes commonweale beginning where the Bible, or Scriptures leaue, and continuing . . . is the title of a book printed in London in 1558 and some twelve times afterwards. Written by Peter Morwyn, it was published by Richard Jugge...

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10. Reading Amadís in Constantinople: Imperial Spanish Fiction in the Key of Diaspora

David A. Wacks

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pp. 183-208

Garci Rodríguez de Montalvo’s Amadís de Gaula (Zaragoza, 1508) was the most important Spanish novel of chivalry to be published in the sixteenth century, and inspired dozens of sequels and imitations. It was responsible for an international boom in chivalric novels in the sixteenth century that...

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11. Apocalyptic Sealing in the Lozana Andaluza

Ryan D. Giles

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pp. 209-232

Antonio de Nebrija, in his Introductorium Cosmographiae (c.1500), followed the ancient Romans in designating the body of water that separates the peninsulas of Iberia and Italy as mare nostrum (our sea) and the mare interius (interior sea) (Flórez Miguel 198). He also includes the later name...

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12. Expanding the Self in a Mediterranean Context: Liberality and Deception in Cervantes’s El amante liberal

Luis F. Avilés

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pp. 233-258

The main focus of this essay is to explore how a Mediterranean experience is the main vehicle for personal transformation in El amante liberal, a novel written by Miguel de Cervantes. More specifically, I am interested in the ways in which a character with limited resources and a narrow sense of the world...

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13. Intimate Strangers: Humor and the Representation of Difference in Cervantes’s Drama of Captivity

Barbara Fuchs

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pp. 259-276

Cervantes’s captivity plays have often been read in an almost documentary vein, for the evidence they might provide of Cervantes’s own experience in the bagnios or, more broadly, of that of European captives in North Africa and across the Mediterranean. Yet the plays are also sophisticated fictions...

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Afterword. Ebbs and Flows: Looking at Spain from a Mediterranean Perspective

Luis Martín-Estudillo, Nicholas Spadaccini

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pp. 277-290

In recent years students of the “Spanish” Middle Ages and early modern period have been reassessing their areas or fields of study at a vertiginous pace. Yet it is also the case that traditional approaches to the cultures and texts of those periods remain part of a larger discussion that has called into question...

Contributors

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pp. 291-296

Index

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pp. 297-306