Cover

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Title page, Editorial series, Copyright

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Contents

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Introduction and Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-xi

“Sovereignty! Sovereignty! Sovereignty!” writes Laura Harjo. “It’s the battle cry for social justice in Indian Country, but have you ever repeated a word over and over, to the point that it starts to look strange to you, and all meaning is liquidated? The discourse surrounding the term sovereignty...

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Sovereignty

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pp. 3-17

“Sovereignty” has served as a rallying cry for what Native nations want and what Native scholarship should support. What sovereignty is, however, remains highly contested. Furthermore, demands for Native sovereignty exist within a larger global context in which the term sovereignty has...

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The Place Where We All Live and Work Together: A Gendered Analysis of “Sovereignty”

Leanne Betasamosake Simpson

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pp. 18-24

A few years ago, I asked an Elder Gidigaa Migizi from Waashkigamaagki the word for “nation” or “sovereignty” or even “self-determination” in Anishinaabemowin (Ojibwe language). He thought for a long time, and then he told me that he remembered his old people saying...

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Visual Sovereignty

Michelle H. Raheja

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pp. 25-34

The term sovereignty is perhaps the most visible, important, complex, and often misunderstood and elusive concept in Native studies projects in this particular historical moment. In fundamental ways, sovereignty in its myriad manifestations is what sets Native American/First Nations/Indigenous...

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Postcolonial Sovereignty

Nandita Sharma

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pp. 35-58

Gaining national sovereignty—the holding and exercising of exclusive authority over a particular territory and all those residing within it—is understood to be a necessary step for decolonization by many. This is as true for those constituted as “indigenous” as it is for those constituted as...

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Land

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pp. 59-70

Native struggles with colonial powers have generally centered on land, and consequently land is a crucial concept within Native studies projects. Land invokes and is related to such terms as sovereignty, belonging, rights, and responsibility.1 Land has both material and meta phorical power for...

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Land as Life: Unsettling the Logics of Containment

Mishuana Goeman

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pp. 71-89

Land is a keyword with much currency, often utilized by Native American, First Nation, Pacific Islander, and Aboriginal scholars to invoke responsibility, rights, sovereignty, and belonging. From the physical homelands of indigenous peoples stem the production of our social, economical...

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No Island Is an Island

Vicente M. Diaz

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pp. 90-108

“No man is an island.” John Donne penned this celebrated insight to debunk the Western notion of “man” as an intrinsically autonomous, in dependent being, thereby reminding us that nobody can work in isolation and that we are interdependent, social creatures. But though it is just as important...

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Indigeneity

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pp. 109-118

The term indigenous designates a political category that enables solidarity among diverse indigenous peoples and nations. However, what exactly makes a group “indigenous?” Although the term indigenous is often used to distinguish Native peoples from those who have ethnic or racial minority...

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Analytics of Indigeneity

Maile Arvin

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pp. 119-129

Indigenous has become an important marker of identity over the past few decades for a number of the world’s Native and colonized peoples. The term also has its fair share of skeptics. Besides being much too academic and general, scholarly debate about indigenous identity has pitted those who...

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Genomic Articulations of Indigeneity

Kim TallBear

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pp. 130-156

Narratives of history and identity that draw on new genomic technologies have gained much traction in the last two de cades (Keller, 1995, 2002; Nelkin and Lindee, 1995; Roof, 2007; TallBear, 2007). This genomic articulation of identity is informed by concepts such as continent-level...

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Nation

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pp. 157-167

Within Native studies, the word nation is often used to signify a Native American tribe. Closely related to other critical concepts such as nationalism, nationhood, and nation- state, the definition of nation in Native studies is not contested, but what nation is supposed to represent...

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Nationalism

Scott Richard Lyons

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pp. 168-179

Let us begin our attempted definition and analysis of indigenous nationalism, quite appropriately, with a brief meditation on Indian lacrosse.
Two games come to mind, although the first never happened. On July 17th, 2010, the British government announced that it would not allow the...

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Indigenous Nationhood

Chris Andersen

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pp. 180-198

The “nation” form, it seems, has become a near- ubiquitous source of collective self- understanding through which we perceive and act on the social world. So ubiquitous, in fact, that Ernest Gellner (1983) once remarked that we must have a nationalist allegiance as we have a nose and...

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Blood

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pp. 199-208

The politics of tribal citizenship in the United States are often directly linked to blood quantum. This summary focuses primarily on the blood-quantum regulations within the United States, but it should be noted that an equally complicated and contested history also exists in Canada...

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Blood Policing

Cedric Sunray

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pp. 209-220

Indian blood is often viewed as the “truth” of Indian identity.1 In fact, it is a metaphor for federal access to services, economic resources, and therefore power. As Foucault reminds us, truth claims are always inscribed in power relations. Thus, this essay will focus on the power games that...

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Mixed-Blood

Andrea Smith

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pp. 221-232

Many Native studies scholars have addressed the problems of blood-quantum politics, including its tendency to equate blood with cultural authenticity. One intervention has been the development of “mixed-blood” scholarship and discourse within Native studies as popularized...

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Tradition

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pp. 233-242

Tradition is often framed as a representation of the past that indigenous peoples today have preserved and continue to honor through a set of practices. Within colonialist discourse, however, Native traditions are supposed to remain unchanging in order for them to be “authentic.” For this...

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Tradition and Indigenous Languages: Accessing Traditions Epistemologically Through Critical Analysis of Indigenous Languages

Marcus Briggs-Cloud

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pp. 243-256

Indigenous peoples frequently appeal to the importance of tradition. However, many understandings of “tradition” mimic the colonial status quo, such as when gender violence and homophobia are defended as traditional. Meanwhile, some queer and feminist scholars critique “tradition...

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Tradition and Performance

Stephanie Nohelani Teves

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pp. 257-270

Hawaiian music and performance are looked to by many Kānaka Maoli (Native Hawaiians) as the aural and visual representation of our cultural traditions and histories.1 It remains a way for us to connect with our kupuna (ancestors), and as scholars of Hawaiian performance have explained...

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Colonialism

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pp. 271-283

Many Native studies scholars have argued that what distinguishes Native peoples from other groups in the United States and Canada is their status as colonized nations. Consequently, scholars contend, the intellectual and political project of Native studies should be decolonization...

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Settler Colonialism

Dean Itsuji Saranillio

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pp. 284-300

As a working concept that should remain under revision, settler colonialism describes a historically created system of power that aims to expropriate Indigenous territories and eliminate modes of production in order to replace Indigenous peoples with settlers who are discursively constituted...

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Decolonization

Kirisitina Sailiata

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pp. 301-308

“Is it even possible to decolonize? I mean like really,” queries a student. The painful honesty and anxious appeal of the question sends the others into a dither. The ensuing replies are mixed with pain and frustration reacting vehemently against the surfacing existential anxiety. I am teaching...

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Indigenous Epistemologies/Knowledges

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pp. 309-318

The long-standing suspicion between Native peoples and the education system probably begins with forced removal of indigenous children from their homes to attend boarding schools where they were to be systematically stripped of their languages and cultural practices. As detailed...

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Native American Knowledges, Native American Epistemologies: Native American Languages as Evidence

Jane H. Hill

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pp. 319-338

The Native peoples of the Western Hemisphere include an immense range of cultural diversity. When we consider the question of Native “knowledges”—and the plural is surely appropriate here—it is unlikely that this diversity will be captured by invoking the homogenizing...

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Epistemology

Dian Million

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pp. 339-346

The word epistemology comes into the English language from Greek to signify a theory of knowledge. “Epistemology is the investigation of what distinguishes justified belief from opinion,” as any standard dictionary might tell you. This Western sense of epistemology denotes a foundational belief...

Editors and Contributors

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pp. 347-348

Index

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pp. 349-356