Cover

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Title Page, About the Series, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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Illustrations

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p. viii

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Introduction

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pp. 1-26

In the immediate aftermath of World War II, the US Army became the principal executor of American postwar governance policy throughout the world. It administered the military occupations of not only the defeated Axis powers of Germany and Japan but also of Austria, Korea...

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1. Military Government Planning prior to 1940

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pp. 27-60

The army’s dominance in the planning and execution of post–World War II governance has its origins in practices dating back to the mid-nineteenth century, including its internal adoption of laws regulating treatment of civilians and its acceptance and application of laws of...

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2. Military Government Doctrine, Training, and Organization, 1940–1941

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pp. 61-92

An institution is as limited as an individual is in its capacity to process information, and its rationality is, as anthropologist Mary Douglas points out, just as inherently bounded. As there are limits to an individual’s abilities to act as a purely rational choice-making agent who seeks...

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3. FDR, Interagency Conflict, and Military Government, 1941–1942

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pp. 93-128

The army’s rise to preeminence and ultimate predominance in matters such as postwar governance came with the nation’s move to a wartime footing. According to Randolph Bourne, in a modern nation-state a total commitment to war links together societal activities with great...

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4. North Africa and the Establishment of the Civil Affairs Division, 1943

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pp. 129-156

Relatively little planning for postconflict administration was done for the North Africa campaign, begun in November 1942 with Operation Torch, the invasion of French Morocco and Algeria.¹ No doubt some of this was due to poor planning assumptions that included the expectation...

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5. Planning and Implementing Military Government in Germany, 1943–1946

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pp. 157-200

The origin of the Cold War is often presented as a series of grand strategic moves in the form of policy decisions followed by actions that revealed either subtle or dramatic shifts in superpower behavior. There is utility in such a presentation as historical shorthand for highly complex...

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6. Planning and Implementing Military Government in Austria, 1943–1946

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pp. 201-228

Austria was by no means as important as Germany was to the United States or Soviet Union geopolitically, and therefore neither nation was as concerned about Austria falling into its respective sphere of influence. Accordingly less studied than the more famous occupations of...

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7. Planning and Implementing Military Government in Korea, 1943–1946

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pp. 229-260

Some historians have viewed the 1945–1950 period in Korea as a time of superpower strategic miscalculation at the expense of the desires and needs of the Korean people themselves. Bruce Cumings, for example, notes the confrontational Truman administration, which sanctioned...

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Conclusion The Postwar Occupation Experience and Its Lessons for the Army

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pp. 261-284

Military government did not end as rapidly as army or civilian leadership wanted. By 1947, both army and civilian leaders saw the need to do so. In July, Assistant Secretary of State John Peurifoy stated before the House Executive Expenditure Committee that while the army would...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. 285-286

I gratefully acknowledge the help and support of many people, and I note from the outset that the opinions expressed herein are entirely my own and are not those of the US Army or the US Department of Defense. Among those I would like to acknowledge include my faculty...

Notes

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pp. 287-350

Bibliography

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pp. 351-374

Index

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pp. 375-396

Photographs

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