Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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List of Illustrations

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p. vii

List of Tables

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p. viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xiv

In completing this book I have counted on the support of so many friends and colleagues that it would take me a separate volume to fully describe what I owe to each of them. I must start by mentioning Mauricio Tenorio and Judith Coffin, who both directed the doctoral dissertation that was the first...

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Introduction

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pp. xv-xxxii

On January 27, 1992, President Carlos Salinas de Gortari signed into law an amendment to Article 130 of the Mexican Constitution, thereby recognizing the legal personality of the Catholic Church and allowing for the resumption of diplomatic relations between Mexico and the Vatican, broken more than a...

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1. Born with the Revolution: From Los Reyes to the Lettered City

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pp. 1-28

In his verse autobiography, Thomas Hobbes suggested that his traumatic birth was the key to his political theory. Hobbes’s brief reminiscence speaks for itself: upon hearing the rumors of an imminent arrival of the Spanish Armada, presumably under the command of the Antichrist’s agents, Hobbes’ mother...

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2. Tempering Passions: Everyday Life and Curricular Formation at the Morelia Seminary

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pp. 29-64

At the closing ceremony of the 1845 school year, the rector of Morelia’s conciliar seminary, Clemente de Jesús Munguía, delivered a long speech on the “origins, progresses and current situation of secondary education” in the institution under his care. As in his patriotic speech of 1838, Munguía reminded his...

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3. The Grammar of Civilization: Language, Rhetoric, and the Shaping of Public Opinion

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pp. 65-94

According to the historian and priest Agustín Rivera, who studied at the Seminary of Morelia in his youth, the course on literature and eloquence occupied the central place in the seminary’s curriculum, even more emphasized than theology. Commenting on his distaste for the education imparted at...

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4. “The Ways of Legitimacy”: Constitutionalism and Church-State Relations in El derecho natural

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pp. 95-136

By the time Munguía’s El derecho natural was published in 1849, the Mexican republic had already established four different constitutions, all of which had failed in their main purpose of organizing a political system “that could command effective and enduring...

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5. The Defiant Bishop: The Catholic Church Confronts the Liberal Reforma

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pp. 137-188

Juan Cayetano Gómez Portugal, the revered first bishop of postindependence Michoacán, passed away in the early morning of April 4, 1850. Although Bishop Gómez Portugal had confronted the secular authorities more than once during his eighteenth years at the head of the diocese, the news of his...

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6. Distant Allies: Conservatism and the Twilight of the Catholic State

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pp. 189-230

On February 2, 1853, the priest Juan de D. Torres returned to his parish in the Purépecha town of Quiroga, from which he had been driven weeks earlier by the local liberals. The priest reported to Bishop Clemente de Jesús Munguía that all the villagers, “men, women, and children,” welcomed him with tears...

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Conclusion

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pp. 231-240

Since the late nineteenth century, historians have understood the Mexican Reforma as a second war for independence, one that pitted a progressive, secularizing, and patriotic liberal party against the deeply reactionary Catholic Church, the last bastion of the colonial ancien régime. According to this narrative, the...

Notes

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pp. 241-284

Bibliography

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pp. 285-322

Index

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pp. 323-335

Other Works in the Series

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pp. 336-337