Cover

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Title page, Series page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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Preface

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pp. xi-xvi

Heavy musketry suddenly erupted near Ezra Church a short distance west of Atlanta at noon on July 28, 1864. The sound signaled the beginning of the third battle fought for Atlanta since Gen. John Bell Hood took command of the Army of Tennessee only ten days before. Pressed to the gates...

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1. A Delicate Movement Maneuver, Battle, and Logistics

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pp. 1-25

During the first half of his campaign toward Atlanta in the summer of 1864, Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman relied on a combination of maneuver and fighting to deal with each fortified Confederate position from Dalton down to the Chattahoochee River. There was hard fighting at Resaca...

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2. They Are Sherman’s Flankers July

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pp. 26-41

Completely unaware that his command of the Army of the Tennessee was soon to end, Logan issued orders for his men to leave their works east of Atlanta on July 26. The movement was to begin at midnight. While some men tore up blankets to wrap around the wheels of guns and limbers...

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3. General Hood Will Attack Me Here! Morning, July

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pp. 42-57

The cloudy, rainy conditions of July 27 gave way to clear skies and warm temperatures the next day. To at least one member of the Twentieth Corps, it was “indeed a most beautiful morning, every thing looks green and lively.”¹
The Federals were in motion at daylight. Fuller’s division of the Sixteenth...

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4. That Shrill, Terrifying Yell Brantley’s Brigade

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pp. 58-72

Lee operated under a sense of desperation when he chose to attack the Federals late on the morning of July 28. John C. Brown’s division, the first to near the scene of action, began the battle as soon as it arrived. Brown rode ahead of his men as they marched along Lick Skillet Road until he...

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5. A Scene of Absolute Horror Sharp’s Brigade and Johnston’s Brigade

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pp. 73-93

Two other units of Brown’s division moved forward at noon, about the same time that Brantley began his attack that day. Sharp’s Mississippi brigade occupied the center of Brown’s line while Johnston’s Alabama brigade held down the right wing. Both units conducted their attack with...

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6. The Bigest Kinde of a Rot Clayton’s Division and Manigault’s Brigade

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pp. 94-113

An hour ticked by between the start of Brown’s attack on the afternoon of July 28 and the arrival of Henry D. Clayton’s Division on the scene, forcing Brown to fight without support. Moreover, Clayton brought only three of his brigades to the battlefield, leaving the one commanded by Brig. Gen...

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7. The Blood-Stained Path Walthall’s Division

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pp. 114-131

The Confederates who fought at Ezra Church arrived on the field in stages. First Brown came at nearly noon, and then Clayton at nearly 1:00 P.M. Alexander P. Stewart brought one division of his corps to the scene of action by about the time Brown fought his division to a point of exhaustion...

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8. Nerve and Persistency Along the Line on July

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pp. 132-147

One more division became available to both Stewart and Lee by the time Walthall’s Division had spent its energy in the last Confederate attacks of the day. Commanded by William W. Loring, it followed Walthall and arrived on the field to form line along the Lick Skillet Road. Born in North...

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9. The Bloody Effects of That Half Day’s Work: The Battlefield

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pp. 148-161

The morning of July 29 began with cool air and a clear, blue sky. It did not remain pleasant for long. By midmorning the temperature rose, and the sun began to burn brightly, making life in the field uncomfortable. Intermittent showers, typical of the South in midsummer, arrived by the...

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10. Enough for One or Two More Killings Evaluating Ezra Church

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pp. 162-177

For some time following the battle of Ezra Church, participants and observers tried to make sense of it. They evaluated their own conduct, assessed the actions of their enemy, and judged how well their commanders had conducted themselves. They also spread rumors and listened to official...

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11. Our True Move July 29 to August 3

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pp. 178-193

The point behind moving Howard’s Army of the Tennessee from east of Atlanta to the west of the city was to cut the last rail link supplying Hood’s army. Despite the enormous bloodletting, Lee’s attacks at Ezra Church stopped that movement temporarily. Sherman had hoped that Howard...

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Conclusion

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pp. 194-208

The battle that Lee started west of Atlanta came to be known to its participants by different names. While the Federals mostly referred to it as the battle of Ezra Church, they also called it the battle of Ezra Chapel. The Confederates often used either of these terms, but they also referred to the...

Order of Battle

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pp. 209-214

Notes

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pp. 215-252

Bibliography

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pp. 253-266

Index

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pp. 267-272