Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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Introduction

Thomas Pink

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pp. ix-xviii

Note on Translation

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pp. xix-xxii

Note on This Edition

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p. xxiii

Contents (from the Carnegie Edition)

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pp. xxv-liii

A Treatise on Laws and God the Lawgiver

Title Page

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pp. 3-4

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Dedication

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pp. 5-10

When I was about to publish my book On Laws, most illustrious Protector, I did not deem it necessary to consider at any great length the question of what person I should select before all others as its patron, that I might commend it to his care, to be defended by his authority, or embellished by...

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Preface

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pp. 11-16

It need not surprise anyone that it should occur to a professional theologian to take up the discussion of laws. For the eminence of theology, derived as it is from its most eminent subject-matter, precludes all reason for wonder. Surely, if the question is rightly examined, it will be evident that a treatise on...

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Book 1. Concerning Law in General; and Concerning Its Nature, Causes and Effects

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pp. 17-150

Following the usual order of this science of law, we shall in this First Book treat only of the general nature of law; offering, however, a preliminary outline of law as it is divided into its various parts, so that some knowledge of them, even though it be a general knowledge, may be obtained...

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Book II. On the Eternal Law, the Natural Law, and the Ius Gentium

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pp. 151-414

After treating of law in general, it is logical that we should pass on to the individual kinds thereof, among which the eternal law has first place, on account of its dignity and excellence, and also for the reason that it is the source and origin of all...

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Book III. On Positive Human Law as Such, and as It May Be Viewed in Pure Human Nature, a Phase of Law Which Is Also Called Civil

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pp. 415-476

In the First Book we divided temporal law into the natural and the positive, and consequently, since the eternal law and natural temporal law have been discussed, the discussion of the positive [temporal] law should follow.
However, in that very passage...

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Book VI. On the Interpretation, Cessation and Change of Human Laws

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pp. 477-500

A law is of itself perpetual, and it is enacted for the sake of the community. Since a law is essentially perpetual, and is enacted for the sake of the community, it is manifestly incapable of lapsing through the disappearance of its efficient cause...

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Book VII. Of Unwritten Law Which Is Called Custom, p. 501

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pp. 501-752

Thus far we have confined our discussion principally to written law. At this point, however, we must turn to a particular study of custom in so far as it embodies law or brings it into being. This order Gregory IX followed in the First Book of the Decretals; treating first of constitutions, then of...

A Defence of the Catholic and Apostolic Faith, p. 753

Title Page

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pp. 755-756

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Dedication

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pp. 757-760

His Most Serene Majesty James, King of Great Britain, in his recently published work, has called upon the Catholic Kings and Princes, as with a friendly trumpet blast, to share in his own religion, that those whom the King of Kings has bought with His own blood for the defence of...

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Book III. Concerning the Supremacy and Power of the Pope over Temporal Kings

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pp. 761-802

A given power may be called supreme, when it recognizes no superior. For this word, ‘supreme’, connotes a denial of the existence of any superior whom the other party—the one said to possess supreme power—is bound to obey.
But it is understood that we are speaking of earthly...

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Book VI. Concerning the Oath of Allegiance Exacted by the King of England

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pp. 803-828

To the preceding parts of the oath, a third is added, as follows: ‘I do further swear that I do from my heart abhor, detest and abjure, as impious and heretical, this [damnable]1 doctrine and position; that princes which be excommunicated or deprived by the Pope, may be deposed...

A Work on the Three Theological Virtues: Faith, Hope, and Charity

Title Page

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pp. 831-832

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Dedication

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pp. 833-836

Far more tardily than befi ts us, most illustrious Bishop, this College of Coimbra, belonging to our Society, and by many titles yours also, offers to you this gift, such as it is. For this College is keenly aware that in you alone there are combined in the highest degree all those qualities by which...

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Disputation XVIII. On the Means Which May Be Used for the Conversion and Coercion of Unbelievers Who Are Not Apostates

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pp. 837-908

The means by which unbelievers may be converted, differ in a twofold way. The means by which men may be drawn to virtue and faith, or recalled from vice and unbelief, are partly those which move the will through persuasion, instruction or kindness; and partly those others, which hold man...

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On Charity

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pp. 909-990

The primary cause, gentle reader, of the unusually brief form in which the following treatises on Hope and Charity are published, was the fact that even the members of the very school over which Suárez presided at Rome, during the time when he lectured on these subjects, became...

Bibliography

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pp. 991-1008

Suggestions for Further Reading

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pp. 1009-1010

Index

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pp. 1011-1058