Cover

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Title page, Copyright

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Contents

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Introduction

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pp. 1-26

On July 23, 2004, eleven years after the destruction of the famed Old Bridge in Mostar, Bosnia-Herzegovina,1 and after a decade of painstaking international diplomatic efforts and more than thirteen million U.S. dollars invested in the reconstruction,2 the new ‘‘Old’’ Bridge was reopened to the...

Part I. Integrating the School

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1. Right to Difference

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pp. 29-62

After the declarations of independence by Slovenia and Croatia from Yugoslavia in the early 1990s, Bosnia-Herzegovina found itself faced with a choice between independence (supported by the majority of Bosniaks and Croats) and remaining in the Yugoslav federation (supported by the majority...

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2. Cartography of Peace-Building

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pp. 63-85

As the previous chapter demonstrated, the school reunification policies embodied ethnic divisions and reemployed ethnic categories in order to examine and fix the social reality at the Mostar Gymnasium. For instance, in the aftermath of the negotiations with the ethnonational leaders and...

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3. Bathroom Mixing

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pp. 86-102

On a beautiful day in spring 2006, Amna comes up to me, hiding one of her fists behind her back: ‘‘Hajmo se mijesˇati’’ (Let’s go and mix), she says. She opens her fist and I see a cigarette, its long, elegant body rolling up and down her palm. She grabs my hand and leads me to the bathroom at the...

Part II. Disintegrating the Nation

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4. Poetics of Nationhood

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pp. 105-138

In early October 2005, I attended a three-day workshop organized by the Mostar branches of OSCE and the Nansen Dialogue Center.1 The workshop brought together a large number of student representatives in an attempt to initiate a Union of Student Councils in Herzegovina.2 For many of these...

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5. Invisible Citizens

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pp. 139-155

On a rainy day in October 2005, I visited my favorite Bosnian pie shop located in the heart of Mostar’s famed Old City. Davorka, the bright-faced and fast-talking owner of the shop, was there. Since I was the only customer at the time, Davorka kept me company. Soon, we started talking about her...

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6. Anti-Citizens

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pp. 156-180

Since the first day of my fieldwork I was struck by how frequently the theme of corruption cropped up in the everyday conversations of my informants, revealing how an empty state became implicated in the texture of everyday minutiae (Gupta 2006:211). More specifically, I realized how discourses...

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Conclusion

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pp. 181-187

Numerous international observers of Bosnia-Herzegovina still refer to the reconstruction of the new ‘‘Old’’ Bridge as one of the most important symbols of reconciliation in the country. For the majority of Mostarians, however, the bridge failed to fulfill the reconciliatory role envisioned by these...

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Epilogue. Empty Nation, Empty Bellies

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pp. 188-192

It is mid-February 2014 and I am sitting in my office at Syracuse University. Husein’s words, ‘‘but wait and see, Azra, narod će se dići (people will rise),’’ with which I concluded this book, are echoing in my mind while I am reading numerous reports, analyses, and predictions about the unfolding...

Notes

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pp. 193-210

Bibliography

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pp. 211-224

Index

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pp. 225-236

Acknowledgments

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pp. 237-239