Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. v-viii

The collection of essays here presented derives from papers given at a conference entitled ‘Crossing the Highland Line in the Nineteenth Century: Cross-currents in Scottish Writing’, held from 8 to 10 June 2012 at Sabhal Mòr Ostaig, Isle of Skye. This was a sequel to an earlier conference with...

read more

Acknowledgements

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. ix

The Editors would like to thank Jim Alison, for his help in planning the conference from which this book of essays derives; Michel Byrne, for assistance in organising the conference programme and with Gaelic language issues; Ian MacDonald, who also helped with the Gaelic; and...

read more

1. Contacts and Tensions: Highlands and Lowlands in the Nineteenth Century

Allan I. Macinnes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-21

From the late middle ages, poets and chroniclers usually propagated antipathetic relationships between Highlanders and Lowlanders. Government officials, intent on punitive military and legislative offensives, claimed the cultural gap between the Gael and the Gall was that between barbarity and...

read more

2. The Poetry of Ailean Dall

Ronald Black

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 22-40

The Gaelic poet Allan MacDougall (Ailean Dall, ‘Blind Allan’, c. 1750–1828) was born in Glencoe.1 He was apprenticed to a tailor, but lost his eyesight, turned to playing the fiddle for a living, became dependent on charity, and was given a house and a little land by a benefactor in Inverlochy. His songs...

read more

3. Cultural Crossings and Dilemmas in Archibald Maclaren’s Playwriting

Ian Brown, Gioia Angeletti

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 41-55

The playwright Archibald Maclaren (1755–1826) has, until recently, been somewhat neglected. There may be superficially understandable reasons for this. On the whole, he wrote shorter plays, often describing them as ‘interludes’, no doubt presented as part of a programme including...

read more

4. What Walter Scott Can Offer Us Today

Christopher Whyte

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 56-71

Who is included in the ‘us’ of my title? On the one hand, it can refer to whoever, in this second decade of the twenty-first century, chooses to take a novel or a long narrative poem by Scott down from the shelf, and read it. But I had in mind a more restricted group, comprising the men and women...

read more

5. James Hogg and the Highlands

Suzanne Gilbert

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 72-87

James Hogg (1770–1835) engaged the Scottish Highlands in diverse and intriguing ways. His most concentrated representations of the Highlands appear in the series of letters addressed to Walter Scott, originally intended for publication as a book but later proposed as instalments in the Scots...

read more

6. The Noctes Ambrosianae and the Highlands

David Manderson

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 88-103

The nineteenth-century Briton often referred to himself as living in ‘the age of periodicals’. Across the British Isles, journals like the Examiner, the Quarterly Review, the Edinburgh Magazine, Fraser’s, The Eclectic Review and the Spectator and a host of other publications had huge readerships and...

read more

7. ‘That Fairyland of Poesy’: The Highlands in Early Nineteenth-Century Women’s Fiction

Pam Perkins

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 104-120

Crossing the Highland Line was something of a fashion in British literature at the beginning of the nineteenth century, a point emphasised by an 1814 novel called The Saxon and the Gael (possibly by Christian Johnstone).1 The heroine, the daughter of a Highland earl living in Edinburgh, is thrilled and...

read more

8. The Unknown William Livingston (Four Songs)

Christopher Whyte

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 121-142

The Islay poet William Livingston (1808–1870) or, to give him his Gaelic name, Uilleam MacDhunlèibhe, is perhaps best known for a series of poems dealing with significant battles in Scottish history, from Calgacus fighting against the Romans to the Wars of Independence and the 1598 Battle...

read more

9. Gaelic Periodicals in the Lowlands: Negotiating Change

Sheila M. Kidd

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 143-158

The nascent Gaelic periodical press which emerged in the period between 1829 and 1850 is of fundamental importance in demonstrating the effect which changing demographics were to have on the production of Gaelic literature. Increasing levels of Gaelic literacy, technological advances...

read more

10. Màiri Mhòr – Victim of Circumstance or Self-Made Celebrity?

Mark Wringe

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 159-171

If there is a theme which runs consistently through the songs of Màiri Mhòr MacPherson (1821–1898), it is vindication: personal vindication, vindication of the Gaels, and vindication of the Gaelic language. The start of her poetic career can be identified with unusual precision: it began in April 1872, ignited...

read more

11. Niall MacLeòid, Bard of Skye and Edinburgh

Meg Bateman

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 172-189

This paper looks at the effect that crossing the Highland line had on the work of Niall MacLeòid. He was born in Glendale in Skye in 1843 and at the age of twenty-two he moved to Edinburgh where he remained till his death in 1913. A rare opportunity for examining the influence of life in the...

read more

12. Robert Louis Stevenson’s Highlanders

Christopher Maclachlan

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 190-202

This paper was originally called ‘Robert Louis Stevenson: The Lowland Highlander’ and under that title it was listed in the programme for the Skye conference. The title stemmed from a vague idea that it might be possible to discuss Stevenson’s expression of a romantic desire to be a Jacobite...

read more

13. Art, the Highlands and the Celtic Revival

Murdo Macdonald

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 203-215

The indigenous visual culture of the Gàidhealtachd has, from the days of the Book of Kells and before, right up to the present, always worked through networks rather than through centralisation.1 That must be borne in mind when we look at landscape paintings of the Highlands produced in response...

read more

14. From Celtic Revival to Scottish Renaissance?

Douglas Gifford

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 216-237

In his essay ‘Arcades’, in The Edinburgh Companion to Twentieth Century Scottish Literature, Cairns Craig argued that there is probably no period in Scottish cultural history more complex and requiring reconsideration than that transitional half-century from Stevenson to MacDiarmid, 1870–1920...