Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-1

Title page, Copyright, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 2-7

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 8-9

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 10-13

During the course of researching and writing this book, I have received support from many directions. I benefited tremendously from a fellow-ship from the National Endowment for the Humanities and from short-term research and travel grants from the Northeast Asian Council of the Association for Asian Studies and from the Japan Foundation. Research ...

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 14-31

Since the 1850s, when Japan was forced under the threat of American warships to open its doors to the world, Japanese society has embraced modernization, and yet it has had to grapple with a crisis of identity that has followed in its wake. Was it possible to absorb a flood of new ideas from the West without being engulfed by them, to appropriate ...

read more

Chapter One. Hamaya Hiroshi’s “Return to Japan”: Documenting the Folk in Snow Country

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 32-84

A photograph shot on a dark winter?s night depicts a boy with a big drum leading a band of children in single file along a pathway that arches across a field (fig. 1.1). The boys? noise making is an apotropaic gesture intended to prevent birds from threatening crops in the year ahead. The photographer?s flash washes out all detail in the immediate foreground, but its impact fades as the landscape recedes from the cam-...

read more

Chapter Two. “Uncanny, Hypermodern Japaneseness”: Okamoto Tarō and the Search for Prehistoric Modernism

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 85-116

The pursuit for a coherent Japanese cultural identity took Hamaya Hiroshi from Tokyo to the Snow Country of the rural north. As documented by Hamaya?s camera, the rituals scrupulously observed by the people of the remote villages in Snow Country seemed to have preserved a way of life untouched by the ravages of modernization. As Hamaya himself observed, a trip from Tokyo to remote areas on the ...

read more

Chapter Three. Ise Shrine and a Modernist Construction of Japanese Tradition

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 117-166

Okamoto Tar??s iconoclastic essay on J?mon and Yayoi offered a productive model for the creative appropriation of ancient Japanese culture. Although J?mon and Yayoi were already firmly ensconced in the Japanese art historical canon, Okamoto?s persuasive argument fun-damentally reshaped the popular understanding of these prehistoric cultures and made them valuable tools for contemporary artists in all ...

Chapter Four. Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained: Tōmatsu Shōmei’s Photographic Engagement with Okinawa

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 167-219

read more

Chapter Five. “Young Female Nomads of Tokyo”: Imagined Migration through Tokyo in the Days before the Bubble Burst

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 220-264

In the preceding chapters, I have documented the relentless pursuit of a cultural ?lost home? in modern urban Japanese visual culture since the 1940s. The artists who produced these images and texts either sought authenticity in Japan?s geographic peripheries or in ?traditional? cultural practices whose origins were lost in time. In the 1970s, in the wake of continuing economic growth, an expanding international po-...

read more

Afterword

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 265-269

Did the obsession with the ?female urban nomad? in the 1970s and 1980s represent a radical shift away from the anxious search for a distinctive and coherent cultural identity that had preoccupied Hamaya, Okamoto, Tange, T?matsu, and others since the Asia Pacific War? Certainly, Jean Baudrillard believed that Japan had cast off its past, surpassing even the United States in its rush to embrace the future. ...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 270-315

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 316-335

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 336-354