Cover

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Title page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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Foreword

Stephen Robertson

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pp. ix-xii

The 2014 Annual Meeting of the American Historical Association featured fifteen sessions devoted to digital history. That range of presentations is in stark contrast to the absence bemoaned by Dan Cohen in 2009. Growth came slowly, as Cohen charted on his blog: nine digital history...

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Acknowledgments

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p. xiii

Early ideas for this book were presented at conferences held by the North American Society for Sport History (NASSH) in 2011, 2012, and 2013, and we would like to thank all those attendees who offered commentary, encouragement, and insight. In particular, we are grateful for the input provided...

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Introduction: The Bones of Digital History

Gary Osmond, Murray G. Phillips

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pp. 1-32

In early 2011, the Australian Paralympic Committee (APC), the national body responsible for the participation of Australian athletes with a disability at the Paralympic Games, published a tender to write their history. The tender proposal was placed online and targeted both national and...

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Part 1: Digital History and the Archive

The first dimension of our tripartite conception of history in the digital era is Digital History and the Archive. As historians, we face a growing abundance of readily accessible digitized newspaper and archival documents as well as new search engines and technologies designed to access and...

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1. The Library's Role in Developing Web-Based Sport History Resources

Wayne Wilson

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pp. 35-52

In his 2005 essay “The Bookless Future: What the Internet is Doing to Scholarship,” historian David A. Bell extolled the virtues of online research and predicted that libraries likely would become “virtual information retrieval centers, possibly located thousands of miles from...

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2. Sport History and Digital Archives in Practice

Martin Johnes, Bob Nicholson

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pp. 53-74

The nature of historical research is changing and changing fast.1 Sources as varied as government minutes and medieval manuscripts are being digitized and made available online at a rate that makes it difficult for scholars to keep up with what is happening, even within their own specialized fields...

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Part II: Digital History as Archive

The second dimension of our tripartite conception of history in the digital era is Digital History as Archive. The rise of social media since the turn of the twenty-first century has created dynamic new sites for public conversation, communication, and interaction, including blogs, Facebook...

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3. @www.olympic.org.nz: Organizational Websites, E-Spaces, and Sport History

Geoffery Z. Kohe

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pp. 77-96

Being a sport historian can be frustrating. The occupation can often involve travelling vast distances to historic sites and/or sport organizations, long hours ferreting away in archival repositories, analyzing dusty documents in darkened rooms, tiresome genealogical searches on athletic ancestry...

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4. "Dear Collective Brain. . .": Social Media as a Research Tool in Sport History

Mike Cronin

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pp. 97-112

I want to begin far away from sport history, but right at the heart of the issues surrounding social media. It is November 2011, and the presidential election campaign is entering its last week in Ireland. The position is one that is largely ceremonial, rather than political, but that in 2011...

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5. Into the Digital Era: Sport History, Teaching and Learning, and Web 2.0

Tara Magdalinski

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pp. 113-131

With each passing day, there seems to be a new gadget, a new app, or a new functionality that allow users even more opportunities to network or connect with others. Far from the early days of the Internet, when websites provided static information that had to be sought out, the Web 2.0 revolution...

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6. "Get excited people!": Online Fansites and the Circulation of the Past in the Preseason Hopes of Sports Followers

Matthew Klugman

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pp. 132-156

I want to start this chapter with a provocative quote from the American sociologist Gary Alan Fine: “The essence of sport,” claimed Fine in 1985, “is not exercise, but memory.”1 Fine made this glorious rhetorical assertion at the end of an abstract detailing his pioneering ethnographic study...

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7. Interactivity, Blogs, and the Ethics of Doing Sport History

Rebecca Olive

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pp. 157-179

Recent theoretical developments have seen many historians rethink what history is, how it can be done, what it can contribute, and how it has impacts beyond the academy.1 Such discussions may seem problematic for those professional historians solely interested in reconstructing the sporting...

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8. Death, Mourning, and Cultural Memory on the Internet: The Virtual Memorialization of Fallen Sport

Holly Thorpe

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pp. 180-200

In his widely cited book, Theatres of Memory, Raphael Samuel pointed to the function of memory keeping and presentation as being “increasingly assigned to the electronic media.”1 A few years later, John Urry proposed that the “electronification” of memory might provide another twist...

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Part III: Digital History is History

The third dimension of our tripartite conception of history in contemporary times is Digital History is History. We perceive that Digital History is History is the most radical dimension of the digital humanities, because it provides viable and engaging alternatives to traditional history. As much...

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9. On the Nature of Sport: A Treatise in Light of Universality and Digital Culture

Synthia Sydnor

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pp. 203-226

In this chapter I attempt to identify and then show how specific cultural and historical studies help create a theory of sport that is compatible with essentializing of origins; these integrative statements help illuminate the human condition...

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10. Who's Afraid of the Internet?: Swimming in an Infinite Archive

Fiona McLachlan, Douglas Booth

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pp. 227-250

The Internet is altering fundamental practices of history, including how historians gather, interpret, and present the remnants of the past.2 In this chapter we analyze the ways that historians of sport have engaged and might engage with the Internet, which we conceptualize as both an infinitely...

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Conclusion: Digital History Flexes its Muscle

Murray G. Phillips, Gary Osmond

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pp. 251-270

In the Introduction to this book, we created a tripartite conceptualization of the relationship between history making and the digital era. It provided a hermeneutic device to position contributions from sport historians, to group their ideas based on similarities or allegiances as much as to separate...

Contributors

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pp. 271-274

Index

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pp. 275-282