Cover

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Title page, Series page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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Foreword

General David H. Petraeus

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pp. ix-xiv

General Jack Galvin has been many figures to many people. And beyond his exceptional accomplishments in and out of uniform, that is why he stood out from his contemporaries and was a model and an inspiration for so many of us. It is also what makes this book so special...

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Preface

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pp. xv-xvi

Everything changed at the end of World War II, with the fall of Berlin and the destruction of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The Russians determined to stay, and the Soviet Union occupied the conquered territory of the Eastern Bloc, pressuring nations to take up the red flag. Tensions...

Part 1. Pleasant Street

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1. The Flashing Eyes

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pp. 3-6

Jo Rogers. My father saw her for the first time in the New England autumn of the year 1926, down by the shore of Lake Quannapowitt in Wakefield, Massachusetts, on the eve of Thanksgiving, at the annual carnival. Drawn there by the lights, the music, and the lazy smoke from...

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2. Shadows on the Ceiling

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pp. 7-16

My first remembrance of my father was as a mountain. The best thing in the world for me was to climb into his bed and nestle my back against his broad back and just stay there, safe and happy. He was always the encourager and protector. When I got on the bad side of the fourth-grade...

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3. The Pleasant Street Army

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pp. 17-22

In 1941, my father bought Kate’s house for $1,200, which was what Kate had paid to replace the mansard roof after a fire. The Cronin family moved into a newly built place in another part of town. With our family together again, we shifted from one part of the duplex to...

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4. If God Was Mad

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pp. 23-28

My father was a bricklayer as well as a plasterer. Our job one Saturday was to take the weather-beaten chimney down from the top of a tall, three-story Victorian house tucked between the hill and the railroad tracks near Greenwood Station, clean the brick, and build the chimney...

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5. My Nine Lives

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pp. 29-36

I’d continued to draw and sketch since the “window sketches” of the neighborhood that my mother had inspired, and eventually I became a cartoonist for my high-school-sponsored newspaper, The Lookout, and later for a renegade student paper with the misspelled name The New...

Part 2. Army Life

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6. West Point: A Time for Testing

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pp. 39-47

In the early evening of the Fourth of July 1950 some of my high school friends accompanied me to Boston’s South Station, where over a beer or two they saw me off to New York. In a splurge I had acquired a Pullman car cabin. My plan was to reach West Point fresh from a good night’s...

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7. Forst Benning: Just Like Artillery, Only Bigger

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pp. 48-54

I signed in at Fort Benning on Monday, 9 August 1954, on a typical hot, muggy summer day in Georgia. As we began the fifteen-week Basic Infantry Officer Course, I spent the Labor Day holiday weekend driving to Atlanta to see the Civil War battlefields. I wrote to my father, “I...

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8. Puerto Rico: Schooling

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pp. 55-62

After Ranger School, I drove to the Brooklyn Navy Yard, turned in my car for shipment to Puerto Rico, and on the last day of March 1955 found myself looking up in awe as our troopship eased into the narrow channel between Isla de Cabras and the looming walls of the fortress...

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9. Lanceros: Continuen

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pp. 63-83

In October 1956, a query came to the Antilles Command headquarters from Infantry Branch: “Is Lieutenant Galvin available for transfer to the U.S. Army Mission to Colombia?” Captain Ralph Puckett had recommended me as his replacement at the Colombian Lancero School. I was...

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10. 101st Airborne Division

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pp. 84-112

In May 1958 I reported to Fort Campbell and was assigned as a platoon leader in A Company, 501st Airborne Battle Group, 101st Airborne Division. When I arrived, everyone was still talking about the mass parachute jump at Campbell a few days earlier, in which several...

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11. Fort Knox and Ginny

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pp. 113-122

In early 1960, I was at the Armor School at Fort Knox, among the young leaders of heavy forces. I learned about tank gunnery on the old M-48. I still have sketches of tanks on the range. I took a great interest in the armor course, which was focused on armor’s roles and tactics, with...

Part 3. War

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12. First Vietnam

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pp. 125-157

10 July 1966. Early morning. I gave my bag to the driver at Vails Gate and climbed into a Greyhound bus headed for New York City. Never again would I pass through that crossroads without feeling a sense of loneliness. The driver cranked the door closed and we pulled away...

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13. Pentagon: The Papers

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pp. 158-174

Ginny had rented a house for us, a split-level on a hillside road in Springfield, Virginia. The place was just right, although I didn’t see much of it. While we—which is to say, Ginny—moved in and put the girls into schools, I reported to the Pentagon, where I had been assigned to the...

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14. Second Vietnam: All Roads Lead to Rang Rang

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pp. 175-216

5 November 1969. I was going back (I thought) to the 1st Cavalry Division, earmarked for command of a battalion. This time getting through the Fort Dix bureaucracy and onto an airplane was somewhat different from my experience of two years earlier. The war had changed, and my...

Part 4. Mixed Command and Staff Assignments

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15. The Fletcher School

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pp. 219-224

Some weeks before I left the 1st Cav in Vietnam in 1970, Colonel Edward C. “Shy” Meyer, then chief of staff of the division, told me about an Army program in which battalion commanders coming back from Vietnam were selected for a move to Europe for a second tour in command...

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16. Stuttgart: The Big Staffs

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pp. 225-233

After the year at Fletcher, and the two summers flanking Fletcher at the Army War College at Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania, I was sent to the headquarters of the U.S. European Command, in Patch Barracks, Stuttgart, Germany, where I served in the front office of the chief of staff...

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17. Belgium: Supreme Commanders Goodpaster and Haig

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pp. 234-238

South of Brussels, in the flat beet fields of French-speaking Belgium, twenty-five miles from Waterloo, there is a sleepy airfield that once played a key role in Hermann Goering’s strategy for stopping the British and American bombers that overflew the field in many of their attack...

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18. 3rd Infantry Division

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pp. 239-248

On 4 February 1975 my name came out on the command list. I was surprised by my promotion to colonel and assignment as commander of Support Command of 3rd Infantry Division, and both surprised and elated to find I would be working with Major General “Shy” Meyer...

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19. 8th Infantry Division

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pp. 249-261

Word came that I would be reassigned somewhere in the United States, since I had by then spent five years in Germany and Belgium. I told the Pentagon staffers that, from my point of view, there was no need to send me back home; my family was happy in Europe, the...

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20. 24th Infantry Division

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pp. 262-277

In the summer of 1980, it was hard for the family to pack up and leave Mainz for a new assignment. Our new station was Fort Monroe, Virginia, which was once a fortress guarding the mouth of the James River across from Norfolk—but in 1980 was the beautiful headquarters...

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21. VI Corps: Warrior Preparation

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pp. 278-292

In early July 1983, I took command of VII Corps. It was my second assignment in Stuttgart, and it took me back to areas of Germany I knew well; I had friends there in and outside the military. My mission was: defend the West German border with East Germany and Czechoslovakia...

Part 5. Southern Command

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22. Southern Command, Panama

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pp. 295-311

Coming out of VII Corps I was promoted to four stars and assigned to Southern Command, with headquarters in the Panama Canal Zone. I landed in Washington on 23 February 1985, with the family. The day was an usually warm and sunny one, with a hint of spring, so we...

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23. Honduras

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pp. 312-318

For Honduras in the mid-1980s, the most likely trouble spot was Nicaragua: a threat fueled in part by our military investment and strategy. The Soviet Union was supporting the Sandinistas in Nicaragua via Cuba as part of its strategy for gaining ideological ground in Latin...

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24. El Salvador

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pp. 319-330

2 March 1985. Before our first meeting with President José Napoleón Duarte, Paul Gorman and I had talked over the situation, and my notes say this: “El Salvador is building, and hopefully sustaining, a national military force of about 50,000.” I compared this with what information...

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25. Colombia

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pp. 331-338

I think big cities have their own collective smell. Manhattan has the smell of a steel mill. San Juan has the smell of the endless wind off the sea. Even in the rain, Berlin smells dusty, maybe because of Teufelsberg and other hills of war debris. (The “devil’s hill,” Teufelsberg is a gigantic...

Part 6. Supreme Commander

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26. Buttressing

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pp. 341-354

After we knew that the Soviets could produce nuclear weapons, and especially after the successful launch of Sputnik, the question “How many nuclear weapons are enough?” was answered by the slogan, “No gaps.” Our national strategy was to be rendered in terms of numbers...

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27. The White House and Nuclear Arms Reduction

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pp. 355-360

About noon on Sunday, 9 August 1987, I left for Washington via Keflavik. Flying with me were two of my staff officers, Colonels Tom Neary and Tom Lenny, who had helped me work up the charts I would show the president. As usual, I sent them to see their counterparts on the Joint...

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28. Conventional Forces in Europe

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pp. 361-371

Talks on the reduction of conventional forces in Europe began in November 1987. As I looked into the questions that were bound to surface in those negotiations, I knew I had the support of the staff of Allied Command Europe and also the staff of U.S. European Command, as...

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29. WINTEX, the War Game

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pp. 372-378

The main purpose of the biannual series of “WINTEX-CIMEX” (Winter Exercise, Civil-Military Exercise) war games was to make sure that all senior political and military leaders of the Alliance were familiar with what would happen in the event, far-fetched or not, that nuclear weapons...

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30. Change: The Right Mix

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pp. 379-386

WINTEX had its effect on much else that followed. It opened our eyes, broadened our understanding, took away much of our posturing, changed our mechanical approaches, and broke through the group-think that bound us. We recognized that we were all out of touch with...

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31. The Wall

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pp. 387-391

To understand the events leading up to the breaching of the Berlin Wall, we need to go back to the end of World War II, when Germany was divided into four sectors: British, French, American, and Soviet. Berlin, the capital, lay in the Soviet zone of occupation, and to resolve...

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32. A Strategy for Change

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pp. 392-403

“Strategy” has become a word of many meanings. It was for a long time linked with military thinking, but in the past fifty years its uses have grown far wider, so that these days everyone needs a strategy for everything. The old word now needs the help of more precise definition; we...

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33. The First Gulf War

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pp. 404-413

With the results of the London summit in hand, I had all the support I needed to work up recommendations for a new operational concept for Allied Command Europe, one that would guide our work on the changing structure of our forces—along with the supporting budget. Without...

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34. Red Square

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pp. 414-426

11 November 1990. Norwegian general Vigleik Eide, chairman of the NATO Military Committee, and I were flying from Belgium to Moscow, invited by USSR President Gorbachev and Defense Minister Dmitry Yazov. We were at a critical point in the midst of an enormous sweep...

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35. The Rescue of the Kurds

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pp. 427-441

In late March 1991, as the first Gulf War came to an end, it was followed by two short internal uprisings in Iraq. A defeated and weakened Saddam Hussein found himself beset not only by the Shiite Muslim factions in the south of the country but—even more infuriatingly to...

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36. Tje New Force Structure

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pp. 442-452

The work of creating the new force structure brought me close to NATO Secretary General Manfred Wörner. He came to meetings with two small but well-thumbed paperback German dictionaries, French and English, propped up in front of him and often in use. I liked this...

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37. The Coup

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pp. 453-456

The Russian armed forces were in a deepening quandary, and there was little that anyone in the Western alliance wanted to do about it—except for the Germans, who quietly financed the construction of quarters for the troops departing East Germany for Russia and also...

Part 7. Global Perspective

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38. Back to West Point--by Way of Bosnia

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pp. 459-475

In the summer of 1991, nuclear weapons were being drawn down on schedule. Soviet forces had backed out of Eastern Europe and were destroying tanks and other fighting vehicles, also on schedule, and we were cutting back on our ground and air units. Both sides had sent all...

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39. Ohio State University and Global Strategy Seminars

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pp. 476-479

In 1994, I left West Point after an eventful two years to join the Mershon Center, a think tank at the Ohio State University, keeping a promise I had made before retiring. There I created, along with John Lewis Gaddis, Paul Kennedy, and Francis Fukuyama, a traveling team called...

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40. Back to Fletcher: Leading and Teaching Leadership

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pp. 480-490

In the late fall of 1994, I was asked to help look for a new dean for the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University. I was happy to join in the search. After my fellowship at Fletcher I had served nineteen more years in the Army, eighteen of them outside the United...

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Epilogue

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pp. 491-492

We are inhabitants of a changing world that will continue to surprise us in all kinds of ways. There is one aspect, however, that we can depend on: change itself. This book carries that message, I trust, along with some ways to respond to it. Most of the relationships that I have called...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. 493-494

First, I am indebted to countless men and women who made my life and my career possible—encouraging, nurturing, counseling, and helping me at every step along the way: family, mentors, teachers, and friends, especially Bob Sorley, Bill Boucher, Ralph Puckett, Pete Taylor...

Index

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pp. 495-520

Photographs

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