Cover

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Title page, Series page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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Preface

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pp. ix-xii

There have been many histories written about West Point. Most describe the exploits of some of its famous graduates, but only a few discuss an entire class. For Brotherhood and Duty is a collective biography about the experiences of the twenty-eight graduates of the West...

Part 1: The West Point Years

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1. Aspirations

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pp. 3-12

West Point, December 1865. The cold winter winds swept down the Hudson River Valley and crept through the cracks and crevices into Quarters 3 next to the cadet barracks. 1st Lt. Tully McCrea propped his game leg up on a nearby stool and reflected on events since his graduation...

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2. The Beginnings of Strife

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pp. 13-56

West Point, December 1865. Tully McCrea climbed stiffly out of bed to the sound of fifes and drums the next morning. Looking in the mirror, he saw a swarthy face with brown hair, chestnut eyes, and a mouth framed by a bushy, brown moustache. His 160 pounds were well distributed over...

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3. Crises of Conscience

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pp. 57-92

West Point, December 1865. Tully’s classroom was on the second floor of the academic building. After hanging up his overcoat, he limped to his desk and awaited the arrival of the first group of cadets. He was an acting assistant professor in Professor Church’s Department of Mathematics...

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4. "When Shall We Meet Again?"

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pp. 93-124

West Point, December 1865. Tully finished grading the boards just as Bentz’s bugle sounded again. Daily grading was one of the bedrock principles established by Col. Sylvanus Thayer many years before. Each cadet was measured daily on a 3.0 scale; less than 2.0 was considered a failure...

Part 2: The Civil War Years

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5. McCrea Joins the Army of the Potomac

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pp. 127-140

West Point, December 1865. The next morning, the blaring sounds of bugles and drums at reveille resounded off the walls in Tully’s quarters. Fortunately, he did not have to get out of his warm bed yet. Today he was scheduled to begin reviewing the semester’s lessons in preparation for the...

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6. McCrea, Egan, and the Maryland Campaign

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pp. 141-156

West Point, December 1865. John Egan mentioned in passing that the order convening the various academic committees to examine the cadets was just posted. As usual in January, the full Academic Board examined the fifth class first. As soon as that class was finished, the board began examining...

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7. Egan at Fredericksburg

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pp. 157-168

West Point, December 1865. The early morning snow had now turned to rain. After breakfast, Tully braved the wet weather to reach the academic building. Even with the festivities and decorations during the Christmas holidays, West Point was not like being at home. He missed...

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8. Sanderson, Arnold, McIntire,and Warner at Chancellorsville

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pp. 169-190

West Point, December 1865. Meanwhile, the cadets had entered Tully’s classroom and stood behind their chairs, waiting for the section leader to deliver his report. They were uncomfortable when Tully stared at them before class, as instructors often issued demerits for uniform infractions...

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9. Calef, Mackenzie, McCrea,Egan, Dearing, and Blountat Gettysburg

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pp. 191-214

West Point, December 1865. The morning class focused on key principles covered earlier in the year. Hands shot up and questions were asked. Tully then sent the cadets to the boards to solve homework problems. The room quieted as the cadets developed their answers. The only sound was...

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10. Mansfield, Semmes, and Westat Port Hudson

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pp. 215-222

West Point, December 1865. After the last cadets left the classroom, Tully continued to identify problems for the final exams. He included a few problems he used in the classroom to give some cadets a few points on the exam if they remembered their homework problems. After finishing...

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11. McCrea and the Battle of Olustee

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pp. 223-238

West Point, January 1866. One week later, the dreaded exams were under way. The corporal of the guard made his rounds calling,“ Section 1, fourth-class mathematics, turn out!” Anxious cadets nervously shuffled their feet in the corridor outside the exam room, awaiting the inevitable...

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12. Sanderson, Semmes, and Westat Pleasant Hill

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pp. 239-246

West Point, January 1866. The math exams lasted two days. After the final section was tested, Professor Church informed the officers about several new resolutions just passed by Congress that affected West Point. The size of the Corps of Cadets was to be increased, and more veterans...

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13. Mackenzie, Gillespie, Calef,Egan, Dearing, and Schaffduring the Overland andPetersburg Campaigns

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pp. 247-264

West Point, January 1866. After returning to his quarters, Tully sought the warmth of the stove and thought about the results of the exams. Most of the plebes passed, but a second examination would be given to each cadet who failed or was judged to be deficient. If they failed again, a...

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14. Murray at Atlanta

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pp. 265-276

West Point, January 1866. The next morning, the reveille gun fired and the drums rumbled in the sally port, reminding Tully of the joyous celebrations that erupted when General Sherman captured Savannah. The cadets learned about it at noon and could not be controlled for the...

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15. Mackenzie and McIntirein the Shenandoah Valley

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pp. 277-288

West Point, January 1866. The dull pain in Tully’s leg still ached in the cold, and he knew it always would. He worried about his future, as he still needed a cane to walk to class. The medical review board forced a number of disabled instructors from the ranks of the army last year, and...

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16. Dearing at High Bridge

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pp. 289-298

West Point, January 1866. That morning, Tully reached the officers’ mess just as breakfast was being served. He and Frank Hamilton shared biscuits and coffee. Frank mentioned that he heard recently that James Dearing’s body was moved from his family cemetery on his uncle’s estate...

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17. Mackenzie, Lord, and Dearingat Appomattox

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pp. 299-310

West Point, January 1866. It was Sunday morning, and Tully had just returned from chapel. He relaxed in his comfortable chair by the stove and reflected upon more recent events. The new year was beginning on a positive note. Peace had come to the land but at great cost. All the Lincoln...

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18. Warner, Bartlett,and the Last Battles

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pp. 311-324

West Point, January 1866. Tully McCrea continued to read the newspaper. Maj. Gen. Oliver Howard, his old mathematics professor, was back in the news again. Southern owners were petitioning for return of their confiscated lands, essentially overturning the “forty acres and a...

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19. Remembrances

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pp. 325-334

West Point, January 1866. Tully’s legs were better now, although he needed to use a cane to walk and probably would forever. The cold weather still made them ache, but the warmth of the fire helped ease the pain. Outside his window, the sounds of a sleigh passing and the shouts of...

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Epilogue Class Assessment

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pp. 335-350

The accomplishments of West Point classes are often measured by collecting statistics, such as the number of members promoted to general officer, the number of awards for gallantry, and how many held high-level offices or commands. Such information about the twenty-eight...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. 351-352

What began as a West Point class-reunion project turned into a multiyear effort. None of this would have happened without support from the late historian Mary Elizabeth Sergent, my mentor and adopted aunt. As one of her “nephews,” I was accorded special consideration...

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Appendix Biographical Sketches of the Class of 1862

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pp. 353-392

The assignment and service information presented in each biographical sketch is limited to their cadet and Civil War service periods. Most information was found in Francis B. Heitman’s Historical Register and Dictionary of the United States Army, Cullum’s 1891, pension...

Notes

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pp. 393-436

Bibliography

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pp. 437-456

Illustration Credits

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pp. 457-458

Index

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pp. 459-496