Cover

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Title page, Frontispiece, Copyright

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Contents

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Foreword

Chief Kirby W. Dendy

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pp. vii-xiv

When Bob Alexander asked if i would consider writing a foreword for his biography of Texas Ranger Captain Frank Jones, I was extremely honored. While having some mediocre knowledge of Ranger history, I am an absolute neophyte in comparison to Bob...

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Preface and Acknowledgments

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pp. xv-xxviii

Texas Ranger Captain Frank Jones merits a standalone biography. Many well-read students, historians, and loyal aficionados of Texas Ranger lore know the name, but not the man. If not all, most sweeping Texas Ranger histories, those within the parameters...

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1. “Dragged to the Ground Lanced and Scalped”

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pp. 1-30

At the time Frank Jones came into a Texas world the place could still be legitimately characterized as the wild and woolly West. The Lone Star State was a hotbed for Indians with ideas of raiding and revenge on their minds.¹ Widespread lawlessness had not yet...

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2. “Beneath the Heel of an Indignant Legislature”

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pp. 31-53

The U.S. army, according to most Lone Star settlers, was near useless—a belief not a fact. Comanche and Kiowa had treated to a tentative peace with the United States and were for the most part residents of the Fort Sill Indian Reservation, though several...

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3. “We Fought under the Black Flag”

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pp. 54-83

The first of the Jones brothers to become Frontier Battalion Texas Rangers were William Kenner and Pinckney. Both enlisted in Neal Coldwell’s Company F in Kerr County on June 4, 1874. Following the footprints they laid down hunting for Indians...

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4. “Several Shots and Run Him into the River”

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pp. 84-106

Subsequent to the annual reshufflings and readjustments and more readjustments mandated by budgetary constraints and unremitting administrative tinkering, the Frontier Battalion’s Company F was strategically positioned at Camp Wood in the northwestern...

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5. “Sworn Enemy to Rangers and Sheriffs”

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pp. 107-129

Incessant comings and goings of fellows jumping back and forth, into and out of the Frontier Battalion makes for a mindboggling task. Thanks to Major Jones’ bureaucratic leanings, paper trails are extant. Resultantly, while retaining their lines on the payroll...

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6. “Sixty Thousand Dollars to Spend”

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pp. 130-152

Sergeant Frank Jones was as unyielding as Captain Sieker with bringing Company D Rangers up to snuff in regards to professionalizing and transitioning into crackerjack law enforcers. Frequently, during Captain Lam Sieker’s absences from camp, Sergeant Frank Jones...

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7. “Most Bold, High-Handed Murder”

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pp. 153-171

For the moment—and it would not hold—the Texas/Mexican border was reasonably tranquil. Pinpointing with exactness—from outside the tent—words exchanged in private between Captain Sieker and Lieutenant Jones is excusably not doable. Real big doings...

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8. “Damnable Act of Savagery”

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pp. 172-193

The year 1886 didn’t open with the sound of gunfire for the Texas Rangers of Company D but there was an explosion—of paperwork. From his base in Concho County, though he picked up mail at Brady, McCulloch County, Ranger C. W. Giffin was caught up in a...

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9. “He Caught for a Pistol”

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pp. 194-215

Within reasonably short order Sergeant Lindsey and his detachment had their assigned section of the Rio Grande under control. Enough so that he could report to Captain Sieker that even though some thieving “Mexicans had been depredating” along the...

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10. “A Strong Undercurrent of Excitement”

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pp. 216-237

Though it would take several months to unravel, an assertion that it was Ranger Private Dillard that had actually popped the cap—or was thought to have popped the cap—killing Abraham Recéndez is further buttressed by another missive. Captain Jones...

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11. “By God, They Will Never Come Back”

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pp. 238-263

For the most part—and facts seem to confirm—the year’s first couple of months for spirited Company D Rangers were rocking along at a reasonable pace. There were scouts and arrests. During one investigative assignment, Captain Jones and Sheriff Baylor...

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12. “Just Plain Legal Assassination”

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pp. 264-287

Whether or not Captain Jones was riding and hiding his pain is, of course, but speculation. Men raised on the wild and woolly Texas frontier, as had been Frank, were well attuned to the fragility of life. Perhaps as a career lawman he was even more aware that the...

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13. “The Shooting Was Promiscuous and Lively”

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pp. 288-314

Cognizant of the necessity for maintaining a Ranger presence in La Salle County the adjutant general ordered J. A. Brooks, since promoted to captain, to move his Company F to Cotulla, replacing Company D. Following an exchange of letters between Captain...

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14. “We Have Been Compelled to Do Some Killing”

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pp. 315-338

November 1891 would not be a fun month for Captain Jones. A type of traveling circus, Zamloch’s Congress of Wonders, had made a stopover at Marfa. Promoters were promising a freaky and magical performance, guaranteeing attendees would be astounded...

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15. “Boys, I Am Killed”

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pp. 339-372

County Judge F. E. Hunter, acting as spokesman for the El Paso County Commissioner’s Court, signed off on a typewritten appeal to Governor J. S. Hogg. The gist of his message was up-front and clear-cut: the county was overrun by a “band of marauders...

Notes

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pp. 373-442

Bibliography

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pp. 443-454

Index

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pp. 455-468