Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 2-7

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 8-9

The topic for this study was initially suggested by Daniel Hoffman, who carefully supervised the work in its early stages as a Ph.D. dissertation. M. Roy Harris taught me Provencal...

Abbreviated Titles by WhichEzra Pound's Works Are Cited

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 10-11

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 12-15

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 16-20

In the autumn of 1904, Ezra Pound began his studies of Provengal at Hamilton College under Dr. William Pierce Shepherd. In March of the following year, he wrote his...

read more

Chapter I. THE SEARCH FOR A LANGUAGE: Early Translations

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 21-52

The act of translation has had a dual function for Pound: it has helped him develop technically as a poet and it has provided him with a series of "complete masks...

read more

Chapter II. RESUSCITATION OF THE PAST: The Provencal Personae

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 53-82

Among Pound's early experiments with Provencal poetry, only the studies of individual poets—"Marvoil," "Piere Vidal Old," "Sestina: Altaforte," "Na Audiart," and "Near Perigord"—and the two translations..

read more

Chapter III. TOWARDS AN EMPYREAN OF PURE LIGHT: The Radiant Medieval World

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 83-114

In the period from 191 ο to 1912, the medieval world became firmly established as the upper pole of Pound's cosmos. In Provenca (1910) and Canzoni (1911), Pound...

read more

Chapter IV. EXERCISES IN THE MOTHER TONGUE: Versions of Daniel

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 115-133

Among the Provencal poets in Pound's work, Arnaut Daniel occupies a singular position. Pound has never considered his personality interesting enough to be utilized as...

read more

Chapter V. PROVENCE REVISITED: "Homage a la Langue d'Oc"

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 134-152

"Homage [sic] a la Langue d'Oc," as it was initially titled,1 is Pound's last poetic treatment of Provence before The Cantos. It appeared twice in periodicals before...

read more

Chapter VI. THE PERMANENCE OF PROVENCE

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 153-165

Throughout The Cantos, from the first version of "Canto I" (June, 1917), to the "Notes for Canto cxvn et seq." (1968), Pound has continually made use of Provencal material, a fact obvious to even the most cursory...

INDEX

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 166-173