Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

Contributors

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pp. vii-viii

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Preface

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pp. ix-xii

A subtitle of this volume might well be a reversal of E Pluribus Unum: instead of "One from Many" it could be "Many from One." Immigrants passed through Ellis Island or other points of entry and then dispersed in various...

List of Tables

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pp. xiii-xvi

List of Figures

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pp. xvii-xviii

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Chapter 1. Introduction

Susan Cotts Watkins

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pp. 1-10

This volume portrays immigrants and their children as they passed through the 1910 census. In 1910, 14.6 percent of the total population enumerated in the U.S. Census was foreign-born, higher than in any subsequent census; in contrast, an estimated 8.5 percent of the 1990 population are...

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Chapter 2. Background: About the 1910 Census

Susan Cotts Watkins

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pp. 11-34

This chapter introduces the 1910 census and the categories used frequently in this volume. l Much, for example, rests on how ethnic groups are defined by place of birth and/or mother tongue; it is thus important to know...

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Chapter 3. Child Mortality Differences by Ethnicity and Race in the United States: 1900-1910

Samuel H. Preston, Douglas Ewbamk, and Mark Hereward

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pp. 35-82

In this chapter we describe patterns of child mortality by ethnicity in the United States around the tum of the twentieth century.] The 1910 U.S. Census of Population asked questions of ever-married women regarding...

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Chapter 4. Generating Americans: Ethnic Differences in Fertility

S. Philip Morgan, Susan Cotts Watkins, and Douglas Ewbank

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pp. 83-124

Compared to other issues examined in this volume (mortality, family structure, and education, for instance), much was already known about differences in fertility between natives and immigrants at the turn of the...

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Chapter 5. Under the Same Roof: Family and Household Structure

Andrew T. Miller, S. Philip Morgan, and Antonio McDaniel

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pp. 125-174

Since the high tide of immigration around 1910, scholars of ethnic history have provided a good deal of information on how immigrants structured their families in households and how various immigrant groups were distributed...

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Chapter 6. Ethnic Neighbors and Ethnic Myths: An Examination of Residential Segregation in 1910

Michael J. White, Robert F. Dymowski, and Shilian Wang

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pp. 175-208

An enduring aspect of the mythology of America is its capacity to absorb immigrants.1 Part of the mythology holds that newcomers arrive in relative hardship, but find a better life, and eventually they or their descendants journey into the mainstream. In many accounts cities operate as...

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Chapter 7. Race and Ethnicity, Social Class, and Schooling

Jerry A. Jacobs and Margaret E. Greene

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pp. 209-256

The immigrant has been a lightning rod for America's passions since the beginning of the republic, yet the polarity of that attraction gradually has reversed.1 At the tum of the twentieth century, the waves of "new" immigrants arriving from...

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Chapter 8. The Industrial Affiliation of Workers: Differences by Nativity and Country of Origin

Ann R. Miller

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pp. 257-318

In the context of this volume, it is interesting to note that one aspect of population increase over the decade 1900-19lO bears a striking resemblance to growth in the most recent intercensal intervals. Of the total ten-year increase...

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Afterword: America's Immigrants in the 1910 Census Monograph: Where Can We Who Do It Differently Go from Here?

Ewa Morawska

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pp. 319-350

As he set out to write a history of immigrants in America, Oscar Handlin realized that "immigrants were American history," and since his classic The Uprooted (1951), immigration and ethnicity have become permanent...

Appendix A: An Introduction to the Public Use Sample of the 1910 U.S. Census of Population

Michael A. Strong, Samuel H. Preston, and Mark C. Hereward

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pp. 351-356

Appendix B: A Tabular Presentation of Immigrant Characteristics, by Ethnic Group

Susan Cotts Watkins and Arodys Robles

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pp. 357-410

Bibliography

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pp. 411-432

Index

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pp. 433-451