Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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pp. 2-7

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PREFACE

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pp. 8-13

Despite the highly symbolic and complex nature of his writings— or perhaps directly because of it—Hofmannsthal has had to suffer more than most writers at the hands of systematizing critics. A standard view emerging from...

ABBREVIATIONS

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pp. 14-15

CONTENTS

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pp. 16-17

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INTRODUCTION

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pp. 18-27

The German Bildungsroman,1 as Thomas Mann reminds us in his reflections on the 2auberberg, represents in a sense the mere...

PART I

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ONE: The Neoplatonic Looking-Glass:The Past as Escape

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pp. 30-50

"Nowadays," Hofmannsthal wrote in 1893, "two things appear to be modern: the analysis of life and the flight from life.... Reflection or fantasy, mirror-image or...

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TWO: The Aesthetic Adventurer: The Past as Assailant

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pp. 51-66

The tale of the poet with his magic mirror constitutes only one half of the story of memory in Hofmannsthal; the other concerns the poet's constant...

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THREE: The Recollected Self: Three Epiphanies

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pp. 67-76

The impressionistic fragmentation of life and the word that Lord Chandos experiences represents a final position neither for Hofmannsthal nor indeed for Lord Chandos himself. For even the black despair...

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FOUR: Remembrance within Change: The Morality of the Allomatic

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pp. 77-88

In 1907, the same year in which he wrote "Die Briefe des Zuriickgekehrten" and began work on Andreas, Hofmannsthal composed a short essay entitled "Furcht." Conceived as...

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FIVE: The Synthesis: Bildung as Vertical Time

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pp. 89-115

It was in the years spanned by his two major periods of work on Andreas, 1907 and 1912, that Hofmannsthal's ideas on a Bildung for the individual finally reached their most...

PART II Andreas

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SIX: The Novel and the Two Hofmannsthals

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pp. 118-129

Much like Schiller, who produced only one novel, and that a surrealistic fragment set in Venice, Hofmannsthal has left us with only...

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SEVEN: Andreas as Hero: The Dissociated Selfand the Unresolved Past

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pp. 130-137

Andreas, like most protagonists of the Bildungsroman, bears a strong family resemblance to his creator. Like Hofmannsthal, he is the only child of a Viennese family; he is a member...

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EIGHT: The Flashback: The Alps

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pp. 138-173

The long flashback in Andreas, which forms roughly half the entire fragment, deserves extended treatment for several reasons. It is the only structurally...

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NINE: The Mythic Substructure:Three Images

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pp. 174-190

In 1917, ten years after he had begun work on Andreas, Hofmannsthal received a letter from his friend Rudolf Pannwitz in which Pannwitz mentions certain Alpine myths that exist in the...

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TEN: Venice: Dream-Theater of the Inner Self

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pp. 191-210

There are all sorts of nooks and corners and hiding-places; the city is full of private staircases, secret doors, and clandestine abodes whose mystery not 'jealousy herself could spy...

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ELEVEN: Spatial Form: The Portrait of Inner Time

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pp. 211-218

Unlike most Bildungsromane, which attempt to present the illusion of that epic flow of time tantamount to personal growth, Andreas is constructed largely about a principle minimizing...

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TWELVE: The Novel as Unfinished Libretto

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pp. 219-227

Over the years countless theories have been advanced as to why Hofmannsthal was never able to complete his novel. Having begun the work when he was thirtythree, he had completed...

CHRONOLOGY

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pp. 228-233

INDEX

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pp. 234-243