Cover

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Contents

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p. vii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-x

Funding for my pre-dissertation trips to Conakry and N’Zérékoré in the summers of 1997 and 1998 came from Emory University’s Graduate School, Graduate Institute of the Liberal Arts, and Institute of African Studies. Funding for principal research conducted in Conakry, Dakar, and N’Zérékoré from 1999 to 2001 ...

List of Abbreviations

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p. xi

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1. Introduction: Whose Re-imagined Community?

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pp. 1-16

Speaking with me in 2001 Alphonse Béavogui2 thought back to a morning of late March 1984, when he first heard of Sékou Touré’s death. Alphonse was preparing for a routine workday at the primary education inspection offices in the remote Guinean forest town of Lola. His daughter must have been startled by Alphonse’s seeming denial. ...

Part 1. Imagining and Instituting a New Youth

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p. 17

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2. Envisioning Youth across the Border of Independence

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pp. 19-55

One of the most fascinating features of anticolonial nationalisms across the world has been their transformation of some of the humblest members of local society into icons of the moral valor and stakes of revolt against the dominant imperial regime. Frantz Fanon was perhaps the most eloquent twentieth-century proponent ...

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3. Ideologies of Schooling, Teachers’ Authority, and Cultural Revolution

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pp. 56-79

These stanzas cast the teacher as an exemplary catalytic figure, fully in synchrony with revolutionary doctrine, who both disseminates national ideals and undertakes concrete pedagogical actions that will usher them into living reality. These actions bridge the political philosophies of the state leadership and the people’s deep desire ...

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4. The Rise of Militant Theater

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pp. 80-104

For Guinean adults, the term théâtre instantly recalls a range of performance genres—chiefly dramatic plays, ballets, and choral works1—that were performed by youths at local and regional arts competitions throughout the country from 1959 to 1984. The victors of these competitions proceeded to Conakry to participate in an elaborate, ...

Part 2. Ventures and Misadventures in the Revolutionary Forest

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p. 105

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5. Construing and Constructing the Nation’s Margins: Troubles with the Forest and Forestiers

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pp. 107-132

One of the most characteristic features of Guinean revolutionary cultural discourses and policies was the persistent view that rural ways were morally and politically superior to urban ways. While never crediting total perfection to rural communities and lives (and thus relinquishing any right to intervene in local affairs), ...

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6. Forestier Itineraries across Revolutionary Pedagogical Domains

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pp. 133-175

Broadly speaking, independence improved forestier youths’ access to formal schooling and various forms of educational certification. The number of primary and secondary schools and overall enrollment rates around the country skyrocketed from the late 1950s through the early 1960s.1 ...

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7. Forestier Stories of Militant Theater: Discovering the Motives and Moralities of a Revolutionary State

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pp. 176-203

Like many twentieth-century counterparts, Guinea’s revolutionary regime struggled to assign definitive positive or negative meanings to the people, places, institutions, and broader social themes that were inescapable elements of the nation’s history and contemporary social dynamics.2 ...

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8. Conclusion: Nationalism and Memory after the Revolution

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pp. 204-214

On March 26, 1984, in his twenty-sixth year as president, S

Notes

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pp. 215-248

Bibliography

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pp. 249-258

Index

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pp. 259-264