Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Content

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. ix

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS are due to the Princeton University- Press for permission to quote from the published volumes of Coleridge's Notebooks, particularly volumes n and in, from which I have reproduced extensive sections, the original...

Abbreviations of Works by Coleridge

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. x-2

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 3-14

THIS essay grew out of an interest in Coleridge's later poems, particularly "Limbo," and out of a feeling that Coleridge was not the failed poet he claimed to be. At twentyone he was lamenting, "I am but the Dregs of my former...

read more

1. The Eddy-Rose

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 15-38

IN his verse letter to Sara Hutchinson that was to become "Dejection: An Ode," Coleridge wrote: "to all things I prefer the permanent." Here the poet articulates the sad changes in his personal lifeā€”his broken marriage, his diminished...

read more

2. Phantom

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 39-82

WITH the Eddy metaphor, Coleridge was able to express the dynamic interplay of opposites that could, in rare moments, achieve an equilibrium in the physical world, an apprehension of Being. But no metaphor could be conclusive...

read more

3. Limbo

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 83-122

COLERIDGE believed that "true being is not contemplatable in the forms of time and space" (LR.,111,320), and yet as a poet he was compelled to find images for his earthly existence from which true Being could emerge. To represent...

read more

4. Beyond Metaphor: Coleridge's Abstract Self

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 123-184

IN "Limbo" Coleridge imagined himself as an old man aspiring to that plenitude of Being that is not found within a fallen world. Like the poem itself, the old man is incomplete, a subject realizing itself through humility, an "idea...

read more

5. Afterword: Journey of Two Magi

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 185-194

IN "Journey of the Magi" T. S. Eliot creates a paradigm for his solitary struggle for Being that may help to illuminate Coleridge's similar experience, and may further suggest why both poets had difficulty accepting self-sufficient...

Works Cited

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 195-198

Index of Names

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 199-200

Index of Works by Coleridge

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 201-204