Cover

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Title page, Copyright

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Contents

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Acknowledgments

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p. ix

Thanks are owed to many people for making this book possible. I am hugely grateful to Don Jacobs and Georgetown University Press for their professional oversight. Great thanks also go to the Leverhulme Trust for awarding me a Research Fellowship to write the book, and to colleagues Alan Cromartie...

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Introduction: Strife in the Village

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pp. 1-17

Ours is an age of anxiety. Many of America’s foreign policy experts believe the world is getting more dangerous. They see the world as equally or more insecure than it was during the Cold War against the Soviet Union of 1947–1991, when a clash between nuclear superpowers could have devastated human...

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Chapter 1. So Near, So Far: Physical and Strategic Distance

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pp. 18-58

What is distance? How is it generated? How does it function in relation to armed conflict? And how are globalists getting it wrong?
In this chapter, I argue that to understand how it shapes and constrains the exercise of power, we should appreciate the distinction between physical...

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Chapter 2. Wars for the World: The Rise of Globalism: 1941, 1950, 2001

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pp. 59-106

To many globalists, America must act as the world’s hegemonic leader and guardian without rival. This is needed all the more, they argue, because the world is shrinking dangerously. When and why did this ideology of the “shrinking world” take root? And why has it proven so...

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Chapter 3. Lost in Space: Al Qaeda and the Limits of Netwar

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pp. 107-147

Today’s terrorism, observers often warn, is borderless.1 Thanks to the pathways of access created by globalization, violent radicals can spread insecurity like an epidemic, meaning that the eruption of extremism anywhere is now a direct threat, even to strong and wealthy nations far away. But how far...

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Chapter 4. Access Denied: Technology, Terrain, and the Barriers to Conquest

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pp. 148-193

In the last chapter, we saw that today’s war maker does not necessarily have the global reach of the trader or tourist. The collapse of space and time may at times confer an ease of access on strategic actors. But their attention aroused, their adversaries can interrupt and reverse that space. This turned out to be...

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Chapter 5. Wide of the Mark: Drones, Cyber, and the Tyrannies of Distance

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pp. 194-215

This chapter turns to two emerging technologies that some observers regard as “globalizing” in their effects. These are remotely piloted vehicles (RPVs) and “cyberwar.” The arrival of new tools and domains of war is one of the most frequent contexts for claims of a globalizing revolution...

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Conclusion. The Geopolitics of Hubris

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pp. 216-228

In this concluding chapter, I do three things. First, I summarize my argument. I then anticipate some possible objections. Finally, I consider the “so what” question, the policy implications of the argument, and where it leads.
The global village myth is a claim about the impact of technology on space...

Index

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pp. 229-243