Cover

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Title page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

Map of Case Study Locations

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xiii

This book is the end product of the Enduring Reform Project, a multiyear research initiative in which a team of researchers in four Latin American countries carried out fieldwork on business responses to progressive civil society–based reforms. Enduring Reform was funded by a grant from the Open...

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Introduction

Jeffrey W. Rubin, Vivienne Bennett

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pp. 1-26

This book is about the responses of businesspeople to successful instances of progressive, civil society–based reform in Latin America since the 1990s. To understand whether and how progressive initiatives will endure beyond the first decades of the twenty-first century, we ask, “Can businesspeople endure...

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1. Social Polarization and Economic Instability: Twin Challenges for Enduring Reform

Ann Helwege

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pp. 27-52

Rapid economic growth and democratization have transformed Latin America in the past decade. With a few exceptions, repression and revolution have given way to the ballot box and growing faith in the legitimacy of public institutions. Despite the fact that Latin America remains one of the...

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2. Rethinking the Revolution: Latin American Social Movements and the State in the Twenty-First Century

Wendy Wolford

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pp. 53-80

It is hard to know when to start this chapter on social movements in Latin America today. A newcomer to the topic could be forgiven for believing that social mobilization in the region began in the 1990s in response to the package of neoliberal economic policies established by northern governments and...

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3. The Urban Indigenous Movement and Elite Accommodation in San Cristóbal, Chiapas, Mexico, 1975-2008

Jan Rus, Gaspar Morquecho Escamilla

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pp. 81-112

In the early 1970s, the population of the colonial city of San Cristóbal, Chiapas, Mexico, and the small highland valley that surrounds it stood at barely twenty-five thousand—numbers that had grown only slowly in more than a century. Nearly all residents were Spanish-speaking ladinos—the term in Chiapas and...

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4. Democracy by Invitation: The Private Sector’s Answer to Participatory Budgeting in Porto Alegre, Brazil

Jeffrey W. Rubin, Sergio Gregorio Baierle

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pp. 113-146

Since 1989, through meetings run by formalized procedures of debate and voting, ordinary people in Porto Alegre, a city of 1.5 million people in southern Brazil, have made decisions about how the budget for infrastructure in their neighborhoods would be spent.1 In addition, they have supervised the process...

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5. Recuperated Factories in Contemporary Buenos Aires from the Perspective of Workers and Businessmen

Carlos A. Forment

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pp. 147-175

When i asked Ricardo why he and some of his coworkers at Ghelco, a medium-sized food-processing plant, had decided in May 2002 in the midst of Argentina’s worst socioeconomic debacle, to “recuperate” their factory after the owner had terminated them and filed for bankruptcy, he responded: “If we...

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6. Both Sides Now: The Rise of Migrant Activism and Co-Investment in Public Works in Zacatecas, Mexico

Heather Williams, Fernando Robledo Martínez

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pp. 176-198

Driving through the Mexican state of Zacatecas, one sees an undeniable contrast between past and present and between wealth and poverty. A few hardy trees, barren of leaves most of the year, lie on the fringe of arid, hardscrabble red-clay soil expanses. Crops of black beans, prickly-pear cactus, and...

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7. When Cultural Activists Speak a Business Language: Success on the Stage, Applause in the Boardroom, and the Difficulties of Scaling Up Social Change in Rio’s Favelas

Jeffrey W. Rubin

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pp. 199-226

When commuters get off the bus from downtown Rio—after winding through miles of working-class suburbs and industrial zones—a train track divides the bus stop from the entrance to Vigario Geral. Returning from jobs and school carrying shopping bags, purses, and children, the residents of the...

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8. Business Responses to Progressive Activism In Twenty-First-Century Latin America

Vivienne Bennett, Jeffrey W. Rubin

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pp. 227-248

Since the 1980s, Latin America has undergone a political sea change, moving from authoritarian, dictatorial, and one-party systems to a politics of continuing and deepening democracy with differing trajectories in each country. Supporters of democracy before and during the transitions have envisioned...

Appendix

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pp. 249-254

Contributors

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pp. 255-260

Index

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pp. 261-270

Back Cover

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