Cover

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Title page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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Introduction. Watch for the Hook

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pp. 1-5

In 2006, comedian Dave Chappelle released Dave Chappelle’s Block Party, a documentary chronicling a 2004 concert he produced in Brooklyn, New York. Featuring socially and politically conscious rap artists such as Dead Prez, Erykah Badu, The Roots, The Fugees, Lauryn Hill, Talib Kweli, Kanye...

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Chapter 1. Behind the Music: Black Political Attitudes and Rap Music

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pp. 6-29

In 2005, Chicagoan rap artist Kanye West, one of Hip-Hop’s most defiant and politically incorrect rappers, decided to deviate from the teleprompter before him and instead voice his opinion on live television during a fundraiser for the victims of Hurricane Katrina and the rebuilding of New Orleans. When it was...

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Chapter 2. Music and Political Resistance: The Cultural Foundation of Black Politics

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pp. 30-50

In 2008, in the midst of the political campaign to elect the first African American president of the United States, Nas, a New York rapper who has produced many political rap songs led a protest outside Fox News Studios. He claimed that the network, specifically anchor Bill O’Reilly, was racist...

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Chapter 3. It’s Bigger Than Hip-Hop: Rap Music and Black Nationalism

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pp. 51-74

In 2004, rapper Jadakiss’s political song ‘‘Why,’’ was discussed on The O’Reilly Factor, a right-leaning news show hosted by conservative commentator Bill O’Reilly on Fox News. O’Reilly, a vocal critic of rap music, featured the song because he believed it was an ‘‘atrocity’’ and offered a biased...

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Chapter 4. Beyond the Music: Black Feminism and Rap Music

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pp. 75-102

In 2007, controversial radio host Don Imus described the Rutgers University women’s basketball team as ‘‘nappy headed hos.’’ In response to widespread criticism, he claimed that the term was derived from Hip-Hop music and thus should not be considered racist or offensive. Imus’s attempt to...

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Chapter 5. The Future of Politics: The Implications of Rap Music and Political Attitudes

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pp. 103-139

The crowd gathering outside the 2006 Video Music Awards (VMAs) was no doubt surprised when Yasiin Bey, the rapper and actor formerly known as Mos Def, began an impromptu concert from the flatbed truck outside Radio City Music Hall. The VMAs are a big deal in the music industry...

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Conclusion. It’s Still Bigger Than Hip-Hop: The Future of Rap and Politics

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pp. 140-154

During the past thirty years, Hip-Hop culture has evolved from its foundation as an urban cultural form into an international phenomenon. There are rappers in countries as diverse as New Zealand, Australia, Ghana, Iceland, Pakistan, Zimbabwe, Japan, Tunisia, Canada, China, France, Germany...

Appendix 1. Political Rap Songs

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pp. 155-170

Appendix 2. HSAN and BPP Demands

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pp. 171-176

Notes

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pp. 177-184

Bibliography

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pp. 185-196

Discography

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pp. 197-208

Index

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pp. 209-216

Acknowledgments

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pp. 217-219