Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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The Contributors

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pp. v-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-x

I. Introduction

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1. Monitoring Social Change in American Society

Eleanor Bernert Sheldon, Wilbert E. Moore

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pp. 3-24

The notion that far-reaching change is taking place in the structure of American society is now rather commonplace. However vague our understanding of the basic functioning of our society, we do know that the growth and urbanization of the population, the rising...

II. The Demographic Base

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2. Population: Trends and Characteristics

Conrad Taeuber

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pp. 27-74

Growth and change have long characterized the population trends in the United States.1 Statistical data clearly document the growth of the nation, the settlement of the entire country, the westward migration, the increasing urbanization, and the concentration in...

III. Structural Features

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3. Production of Goods and Services: The Measurement of Economic Growth

A. W. Sametz

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pp. 77-96

Although the "national income and product accounts" for the ft U.S. are among the best known and reputable economic series, they are not very useful to measure economic growth or welfare. The accounts do, of course, serve the purpose for which they...

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4. Labor Force and Employment Trends

Stanley Lebergott

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pp. 97-144

Every forceful change in American society and the American economy has had its impact on the pattern of labor supply and use. Variations in supply and utilization have, in turn, induced changes in the economy, for employees are both the producers...

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5. The Measurement of Knowledge and Technology

Daniel Bell

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pp. 145-246

Let us begin with a parable: all the rest is exegesis.
. . . the Library is composed of an indefinite, perhaps an infinite number of hexagonal galleries, with enormous ventilation shafts in the middle, excluded by very low railings...

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6. The Changing Politics of American Life

Joyce M., William C. Mitchell

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pp. 247-294

While historians have been assiduous in their quest to describe change in the United States, they have not often tried broader and more systematic estimates of what changes, at what rates, in which directions, and how. One result has been a confusion...

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7. The Theory and Measurement of Family Change

William J. Goode

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pp. 295-348

In the field of the family, analysts have for generations been concerned with the problems of social change. Like sociologists in other subfields, however, they have not been able to overcome the difficulties of achieving precise measurement and fruitful theory...

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8. Trends and Anti-Trends in Religious Change

N. J. Demerath III

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pp. 349-446

One of the fundamental ingredients of any meaningful religion may be a confidence that it has undergone and is still undergoing change. Few would doubt that American religion has changed since the nineteenth century, but few would agree on the patterns...

IV. Distributive Features

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9. Consumption: A Report on Contemporary Issues

Milton Moss

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pp. 449-524

In a very broad sense all that is required to upgrade the economic well-being of everyone in American society is an expanding economy supplemented by selective policies to overcome economic hardship. Living standards could be improved for all households...

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10. The Definition and Measurement of Leisure

Philip H. Ennis

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pp. 525-572

Of all the great categories of life, leisure is surely one of the most untidy. As individual experience or as behavior of large numbers of people, it is more diverse, more resistant to secure definition and measurement than most other aspects of social life...

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11. Problems in the Measurement of Heath Status

Iwao M. Moriyama

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pp. 573-600

The average life expectancy at birth in the United States increased from 47.3 years in 1900 to 70.2 years in 1964. The remarkable increase in longevity is frequently presented as evidence of health progress made by the general population in the United States...

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12. Trends in Output and Distribution of Schooling

Beverly Duncan

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pp. 601-672

The amount of knowledge that an individual can command is not limited by the amount of knowledge held by other individuals, except insofar as their aggregate holdings are the sum of what is known. The primary mechanism for transmitting knowledge from...

V. Aggregative Features

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13. Social Stratification and Mobility: Problems in the Measurement of Trend

Otis Dudley Duncan

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pp. 675-720

The spatiotemporal frame of reference for this chapter is the United States since about the end of World War I. For the purpose of sketching movements in the state of opinion on the topic-the first task of the chapter-a further restriction is advisable...

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14. Welfare and its Measurement

Ida C. Merriam

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pp. 721-784

Welfare is a summing-up concept-appropriately placed at the end of a volume on social change. Growth in population, changes in technology, in work and play, in family relations and social organization (or disorganization) all have welfare aspects...

Reference Tables

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pp. 785-804

Index

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pp. 805-822