Cover

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Contents

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p. vii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-x

It is truly a pleasure to acknowledge the many people who have helped, explained, encouraged, and read these chapters in many forms over many years. Daniel Waugh has been a teacher, an advisor, and a very patient friend for more than twenty years; any insights that have found their way into this book are largely due to his efforts. ...

List of Abbreviations

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pp. xi-xii

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Introduction: The New Patriarch

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pp. 1-9

Early in 1589, in a procession glittering with gold and gemstones and perfumed with incense, the first Russian patriarch was installed by the highest-ranking dignitary of the Eastern Church, Hieremias, Patriarch of Constantinople. It was a glorious moment for the Muscovite church. ...

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One The True False Dmitrii and the Death of Music in Moscow

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pp. 10-24

We all think we know what happened to the False Dmitrii, the imposter of Modest Musorgskii’s opera Boris Godunov, who schemed with the calculating Jesuits and power-hungry Poles who supported his claim to be the miraculously living son of Ivan the Terrible. If we know the first version of Musorgskii’s opera, ...

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Two ‘‘Wondrous singers and exceptional voices’’: Singers and Singing in Muscovy

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pp. 25-56

The story of the False Dmitrii includes both liturgical singing by Russian performers, at the coronation-wedding ceremony, and secular singing by foreigners during the week of celebrations following. In spite of the dramatic and hostile Russian reaction to the foreign musicians, each of these singing traditions—liturgical and secular ...

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Three ‘‘Sweet and harmonious singing’’: Domestic Singers and Domestic Singing

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pp. 57-76

Who were the other singers at court, apart from the professional ranks of the sovereign and patriarchal singers and the krestovye d’iaki? Court documents refer to a group of domestic singers (or perhaps more accurately, domestic spiritual helpmates who also sang) whose repertoire was sacred but not liturgical, ...

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Four Tavern and Wedding: The Instrumental Traditions at the Muscovite Court

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pp. 77-104

n January 1648, the third year of his reign, the young Tsar Aleksei Mikhailovich celebrated his wedding to Mariia Il’inichna Miloslavskaia. Aleksei was well known for his piety, which was reflected in the somewhat unusual musical arrangements made for the ceremony. ...

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Five Nikolai Diletskii: Language and Imagery in Muscovite Music Theory

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pp. 105-162

The musical changes we have traced—the introduction and popularity in Muscovy of kanty, kontserty, and the notational practices they brought with them, the increasing numbers of Ukrainian and Belarusian singers and singing styles, and the lively range of instrumental entertainment—are mirrored by equally great changes in the language ...

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Six The Muscovite Court Theater

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pp. 163-211

The evening of 17 October 1672 was an event to remember. This was the opening night of Moscow’s first-ever court theater, and the production was a resounding success. The tsar watched from a seat placed in front-row center, his wife, Tsaritsa Natal’ia, observed from behind a screen, and the rest of the audience—high-ranking figures all ...

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Epilogue. Reversing Our Gaze: A Case Study

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pp. 212-224

If there is a single, overarching theme of this study it is surely this simple idea: an appreciation of the multiplicity in the worlds of Muscovite music-making and in the sources that can tell us about these activities. This book has focused on music and musical practices associated with a very small segment ...

Appendix

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pp. 225-228

Notes

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pp. 229-310

Bibliography

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pp. 311-342

Index

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pp. 343-359