Cover

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Contents

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p. vii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-x

This book is the result of ten years of research and writing in various places of the transatlantic world. Following the traces of intercultural transfer in the nineteenth century, the inquiry into the exchange processes between various cities within the transatlantic world brought me from Germany to Canada and finally to the United States. ...

Part One

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p. 1

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Introduction

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pp. 3-12

This book introduces the concept of intercultural transfer to the study of transnational and modern transatlantic history.1 The subject of this book is not American, British, Canadian, or German history per se but the entangled and interconnected histories of urban communities in these four countries. ...

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Chapter One Cultural Excursions: Museums, Art Galleries, and Libraries in a Transatlantic World

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pp. 13-38

Since the German social welfare state entered a period of crisis and reconstruction, both Conservatives and Social Democrats have encouraged the revitalization of private funding for public cultural institutions such as art galleries and museums. The reconstruction of the Frauenkirche is the most visible sign of this new political climate. ...

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Chapter Two Heavy Luggage: The Intercultural Transfer of Models for Social Housing Enterprises

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pp. 39-86

In the second half of the nineteenth century, the population of American cities increased significantly because of a new wave of European immigrants.1 America’s leisure class became concerned about the social, cultural, and political repercussions of the dreadful housing conditions of the poor. ...

Part Two

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p. 87

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Chapter Three How to Become a Gentleman: Philanthropy and Social Climbing

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pp. 89-125

The intensive intercultural transfer across the Atlantic resulted in the creation of a tight network of cultural and social philanthropic institutions within urban centers of the transatlantic community. Philanthropists— women, men, Catholics, Protestants, and Jews—organized and financed the museums, libraries, hospitals, and social housing enterprises ...

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Chapter Four Bountiful Ladies: Philanthropy and Women’s Place in Society

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pp. 126-152

The phrase “women’s nature and mission”1 dominated the nineteenthcentury discourse on the place of women in bourgeois society. Because of assumptions about their “natural role,” women were stereotyped as caregivers who “could only” find fulfillment in the management of their household and family. ...

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Chapter Five Giving for Good: Philanthropy and Religion

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pp. 153-180

The concept of charity is as old as human civilization and has become a mainstay of all three major monotheistic religions. As Kathleen Woodroofe has pointed out, however, “Ideas of philanthropy have varied at different times, for although the giving a man does is personal, it is influenced, not only by the size of his pocket, but by the gods he worships, ...

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Conclusion

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pp. 181-182

The shift from a focus on national history to a topical history across various regions and countries allows us to reconsider the importance of the nation-state and national identity in the long nineteenth century. Even though the nation-state has shaped nineteenth-century society and the way historians write the history of that period, ...

Notes

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pp. 183-228

Index

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pp. 229-237