Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication, About the Series, Other Works in the Series

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Contents

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pp. ix-xii

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About the Author

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pp. xiii-xiv

Russell Hardin is professor of politics at New York University and professor of political science at Stanford University.

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xv-xviii

I wish to thank many people—friends, relatives, colleagues, and new, often one-time acquaintances—for discussions of trust. Included in this large crowd are Richard Arneson, David Blau, Karen Cook, Sven Feldmann, Claire Finckelstein, Joan Rothchild Hardin, Josh Hardin, Daniel Kahneman, Margaret Levi, Bernard Manin, Howard...

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Preface

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pp. xix-xxii

This book presents an account of a particular but important class of trust relations: trust as encapsulated interest, in which the truster’s expectations of the trusted’s behavior depend on assessments of certain motivations of the trusted. I trust you because your interests encapsulate mine to some extent—in particular, because...

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1. Trust

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pp. 1-27

Usually, to say that I trust you in some context simply means that I think you will be trustworthy toward me in that context. Hence to ask any question about trust is implicitly to ask about the reasons for thinking the relevant party to be trustworthy. In chapter 2, I canvass some of the potentially many reasons for thinking...

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2. Trustworthiness

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pp. 28-53

The great importance of trust in ordinary life can be read in the massive role it plays in great literature—or, rather, the role that betrayal of trust plays. Trust may be second only to love as a plot line and motivator, and even half of the power of love as a plot line is in the eventual betrayal of it. Betrayal is, of course, not a failure...

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3. Conceptions and Misconceptions

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pp. 54-88

Strategically, trust interactions can take varied forms. Two of the most important are the iterated one-way trust game and the mutual trust interaction of iterated exchange or prisoner’s dilemma. In these models of some trust relationships, trust is clearly a reductive term, a three-part relation, and a cognitive—not...

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4. Distrust

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pp. 89-112

If the evidence sometimes leads to trust, then it can also sometimes lead to distrust. Indeed, on the cognitive account of trust as a category of knowledge, we can go further to say the following: If, on your own knowledge, I seem to be trustworthy to some degree with respect to some matter, then you do trust me with respect to that...

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5. The Epistemology of Trust

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pp. 113-132

If we wish to understand trust for real people, we will have to understand the capacity for trust, which is the capacity to read the commitments of others, a capacity that must largely be learned. Hence we must understand trust from the commonsense epistemology of the individual in a position to trust or distrust. One cannot...

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6. Managing Trust

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pp. 133-150

There are many questions we might wish to ask about how trust relationships come to be and why they last or fail. I wish to discuss three general stages of this range of problems: How do individuals come to be optimistic enough to risk the cooperation that often leads to trust? How do they initiate trust relationships with...

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7. Trust and Government

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pp. 151-172

A large and growing literature focuses on the theses that, if it is to function at all well, government needs the trust of its citizens and that such trust is now declining in the United States and in certain other nations. Hence there is a crisis of trust. At most, this claim is misstated. It should, rather, be made merely about...

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8. Trust and Society

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pp. 173-200

We are concerned with trust and trustworthiness because they enable us to cooperate for mutual benefit. Cooperation is the prior and central concern. There are manifold instances of cooperation that need not and quite likely do not involve trust. Trust is merely one reason for confidence in taking cooperative risks, and...

Appendix: Survey Questions on Trust

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pp. 201-202

Notes

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pp. 203-216

References

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pp. 217-226

Index

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pp. 227-234