Cover

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Title Page, Copyright Page

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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About the Authors

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pp. ix-x

BARRY BLUESTONE is the Russell B. and Andree B. Stearns Trustee Professor of Political Economy and director of the Center for Urban and Regional Policy at Northeastern University. MARY HUFF STEVENSON is associate professor of economics at the University of Massachusetts, Boston, and senior fellow at its McCormack...

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Preface

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pp. xi-xiv

Unlike diamonds, which are supposed to be forever, cities and their surrounding regions seldom stay the same for long. Populations expand and contract; neighborhoods transform; some industries thrive, while others fail; economic boundaries shift, even if political boundaries do not. All these changes have enormous...

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Chapter 1. Greater Boston in Transition

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pp. 1-22

WHEN we consider how cities and regions change, we normally think in terms of evolution, not revolution. Yet Boston is undergoing a demographic, industrial, and spatial revolution of enormous proportion-if, by revolution, we mean something that changes dramatically in a brief space of time. Today's visitor to Boston will no doubt be surprised to...

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Chapter 2. The Demographic Revolution: From White Ethnocentric to Multicultural Boston

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pp. 23-50

NEARLY a century ago, when it was still commonly known for the cod and the baked bean, Boston was largely distinguished by its English, Irish, and Italian roots. It was home to families with names like Adams and Smith, O'Donnell, Murphy, and Dorgan, and the recently arrived Marinos and Toscanos. Other ethnic groups, including a...

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Chapter 3. The Industrial Revolution: From Mill-Based to Mind-Based Industries

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pp. 51-73

THE SINGLE most important factor affecting a household's economic well-being is its relation to the labor market. After all, with the exception of the very rich, the very poor, and the retired, the majority of most families' income emanates from earnings, not from income-generating assets or transfer payments. Annual earnings for a...

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Chapter 4. The Spatial Revolution: From Hub to Metropolis

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pp. 74-107

FROM the top floor of Boston's tallest skyscraper, I. M. Pei's John Hancock Building, one can view both the tiny area that comprised colonial Boston and the broad sweep of settlement that comprises Greater Boston today. While every metropolitan area can tell a story of outward expansion from an original core city, the Greater Boston story...

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Chapter 5. Who We Are: How Families Fare in Greater Boston Today

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pp. 108-143

AN IMPORTANT starting point for any discussion of a place is to find out who lives there. Since this research is especially aimed at understanding those characteristics of households and individuals that affect the opportunity nexus, and in particular how that nexus differs for non-Hispanic black, Hispanic, and non-Hispanic...

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Chapter 6. What Do Boston-Area Residents Think of One Another?

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pp. 144-164

BOSTON'S history, like that of many other cities, has a legacy of racial and ethnic division. Especially in the decades after World War II, blacks and whites were at odds over neighborhoods, schools, jobs, and politics. An environment of conflict and distrust influenced racial identity and often...

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Chapter 7. Residential Preferences and Segregation

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pp. 165-198

IN THE last chapter, we considered prevailing racial and ethnic attitudes in Greater Boston. The analysis suggested that the region faces a great challenge, to the extent that a significant proportion of each racial and ethnic group perceives its own economic and political future as part of a zero-sum game. Whites worry that...

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Chapter 8. The Labor Market: How Workers with Limited Schooling Are Faring in Greater Boston

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pp. 199-273

WE ARE now prepared to ask how the triple revolution and the opportunity nexus have figured in the success or failure of blacks, Hispanics, and whites in the regional labor market. In the complex environment of multicultural Boston, where high-tech is king and the economy is strong; where ethnic...

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Chapter 9. The Impact of Human, Social, and Cultural Capital on Job Slots and Wages

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pp. 274-332

IN THE last chapter we studied the determinants of hourly wages and annual earnings for black, Hispanic, and white workers with limited education. We devoted special attention to this group because those who are least advantaged in terms of schooling presumably are the ones who would be most adversely affected...

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Chapter 10. What Do Boston Area Employers Seek in Their Workers?

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pp. 333-366

IN THE two preceding chapters, we examined how labor markets operate from the vantage point of the individual worker. We asked a series of questions, including: What factors affect the likelihood that an individual will be in the labor force? Be unemployed? Occupy a particular job slot? Work a certain number of hours per week? Earn a specified...

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Chapter 11. Sharing the Fruits of Greater Boston's Renaissance

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pp. 367-392

TO SUCCEED over the long run, every metropolitan area must periodically reinvent itself, as the leading industries of one generation become the sunset industries of the next. Some areas seem better able to do this than others. The phenomenal resuscitation of Greater Boston, from economic basket case of the 1950s, 1960s, and...

Notes

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pp. 393-408

References

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pp. 409-434

Index

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pp. 435-461