Cover

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Title Page, Series page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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List of Illustrations

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p. ix

List of Maps

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p. x

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Preface

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pp. xi-xii

Unlike other books in this series, this one covers campaigns that took place in both of the major theaters of the American Civil War, the eastern and the western, and it touches on a few events that occurred beyond them. It would have been impossible to...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xiii-xvi

When the hard work of writing a book is done, it is a great pleasure to thank the people who helped the effort. In this case, there were so many that I am almost certain to forget some of them. I apologize in advance for my omissions...

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Series Editors’ Introduction

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pp. xvii-xx

Americans remain fascinated by the Civil War. Movies, television, and video—even computer software—have augmented the ever-expanding list of books on the war. Although it stands to reason that a large portion of recent work concentrates on military aspects...

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1. Terrible Times of Shipwreck

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pp. 1-16

Col. Joseph Frederick Waring, the commander of Mississippi’s Jefferson Davis Legion, was a well-read and observant Confederate cavalry officer. He concluded one Saturday in the dead of the winter of 1864–65 that the season of the...

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2. Fort Fisher and Wilmington

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pp. 17-35

Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant’s grand strategy for 1865 called for Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman to sweep north through the Carolinas toward Petersburg, Virginia, where Gen. Robert E. Lee stood pinned in his trenches. Wilmington, North Carolina...

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3. In the Carolinas

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pp. 36-60

With Wilmington secured, Maj. Gen. John M. Schofield, the commander of the Department of North Carolina, turned his attention about ninety-five miles northeast to New Bern, a city that had been in Federal hands since...

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4. Bentonville

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pp. 61-78

While Lt. Gen. William J. Hardee’s soldiers fought at Averasboro, Gen. Joseph E. Johnston gathered the rest of his units around Smithfield. General Johnston finally achieved the concentration of forces that the Confederates...

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5. Late Winter at Petersburg

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pp. 79-103

As 1864 drew to an end, Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia held its extensive trenches around Richmond and Petersburg with a threadbare force of about 66,500 effectives. The Confederates had stretched their lines to...

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6. The Fall of Petersburg

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pp. 104-127

On March 28, 1865, three days after the attack on Fort Stedman, President Abraham Lincoln, Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman, and Rear Adm. David Dixon Porter met on the River Queen at a wharf in City Point, Virginia...

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7. To Sailor’s Creek

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pp. 128-149

For years Union strategy in the eastern theater of the Civil War had aimed at capturing Richmond, but the fall of the Confederate capital proved an anticlimax. The Army of the Potomac did not enter the prized city but instead pursued the...

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8. Spring Morning

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pp. 150-174

Every day and night during the march from Petersburg, the Confederates became more famished and exhausted. Ordnance Sgt. James W. Albright, one of Lt. Gen. Richard H. Anderson’s survivors of Sailor’s Creek, characterized the artillerymen...

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9. A Scrap of Paper

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pp. 175-203

At Goldsboro, North Carolina, on March 23, 1865, two days after the Battle of Bentonville, Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman finished combining his force with Maj. Gen. John M. Schofield’s two corps. General Sherman then had eighty-one...

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10. Scattered Embers

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pp. 204-216

With the surrender of Gen. Joseph E. Johnston, Federal forces extinguished the once-raging bonfire of Confederate military resistance. But some embers remained scattered across the South, and they continued to glow. Each was...

Notes

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pp. 217-264

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Bibliographic Essay

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pp. 265-276

Many works treat the last campaigns of the American Civil War or particular aspects of them. This essay identifies some of the sources that supported this book’s accounts of the conflict’s final operations, and it points readers to materials for further study of...

Index

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pp. 277-287

Illustrations

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pp. 288-295