In this Book

summary
In the courtroom and the classroom, in popular media, public policy, and scholarly pursuits, the Holocaust-its origins, its nature, and its implications-remains very much a matter of interest, debate, and controversy. Arriving at a time when a new generation must come to terms with the legacy of the Holocaust or forever lose the benefit of its historical, social, and moral lessons, this volume offers a richly varied, deeply informed perspective on the practice, interpretation, and direction of Holocaust research now and in the future. In their essays the authors-an international group including eminent senior scholars as well those who represent the future of the field-set the agenda for Holocaust studies in the coming years, even as they give readers the means for understanding today's news and views of the Holocaust, whether in court cases involving victims and perpetrators; international, national, and corporate developments; or fictional, documentary, and historical accounts.

Several of the essays-such as one on nonarmed "amidah" or resistance and others on the role of gender in the behavior of perpetrators and victims-provide innovative and potentially significant interpretive frameworks for the field of Holocaust studies. Others; for instance, the rounding up of Jews in Italy, Nazi food policy in Eastern Europe, and Nazi anti-Jewish scholarship, emphasize the importance of new sources for reconstructing the historical record. Still others, including essays on the 1964 Frankfurt trial of Auschwitz guards and on the response of the Catholic Church to the question of German guilt, bring a new depth and sophistication to highly charged, sharply politicized topics. Together these essays will inform the future of the Holocaust in scholarly research and in popular understanding.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title page, Copyright, Dedication
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  1. Contents
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  1. Foreword
  2. Theodore Zev Weiss
  3. pp. xi-xii
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. xiii-xiv
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  1. Introduction
  2. Jeffry M. Diefendorf
  3. pp. xv-xxxiv
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  1. I. Rethinking Nazi Policies
  2. pp. 3-4
  1. Concentration Camps and Cultural Policy: Rethinking the Development of the Camp System, 1936–41
  2. Paul B. Jaskot
  3. pp. 5-20
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  1. The Relationship of the Auschwitz Camp to the Outside Environment, Economy, and Society
  2. Sybille Steinbacher
  3. pp. 21-36
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  1. The Nazis and the Jews of Italy: New Sources on the Responsibility for the Holocaust in Italy
  2. Richard Breitman
  3. pp. 37-52
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  1. II. Resistance and Rescue
  2. pp. 53-54
  1. The Problem of Non-Armed Jewish Reactions to Nazi Rule in Eastern Europe
  2. Yehuda Bauer
  3. pp. 55-68
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  1. Motivation in Holocaust Rescue: The Case of Jan Zwartendijk in Lithuania, 1940
  2. Jonathan Goldstein
  3. pp. 69-87
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  1. Against All Odds: Successes and Failures of the Dutch Palestine Pioneers
  2. Yehudi Lindeman
  3. pp. 88-111
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  1. Women of Courage: The Kashariyot (Couriers) in the Jewish Resistance During the Holocaust
  2. Lenore J. Weitzman
  3. pp. 112-152
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  1. III. German Scholars and the Holocaust
  2. pp. 153-154
  1. Anti-Jewish Research of the Institut zur Erforschung der Judenfrage in Frankfurt am Main between 1939 and 1945
  2. Patricia von Papen-Bodek
  3. pp. 155-189
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  1. Unasked Question: The Controversy about Nazi Collaboration among German Historians
  2. Konrad Jarausch
  3. pp. 190-208
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  1. The Historiography of Horror: The Frankfurt Auschwitz Trial and the German Historical Imagination
  2. Devin Pendas
  3. pp. 209-230
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  1. IV. Historiography and the Challenges to Historians
  2. pp. 231-232
  1. “Euphoria of Victory” as the Key: Situating Christopher Browning on the Map of Research on the “Final Solution of the Jewish Question”
  2. Dan Michman
  3. pp. 233-251
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  1. Browning and the Big Picture
  2. Gerhard Weinberg
  3. pp. 252-258
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  1. New Research on the Holocaust in Poland
  2. Dariusz Stola
  3. pp. 259-284
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  1. Some Recent Trends in German Holocaust Research
  2. Christian Gerlach
  3. pp. 285-299
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  1. Does Atrocity Have a Gender? Feminist Interpretations of Women in the SS
  2. Susannah Heschel
  3. pp. 300-322
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  1. V. Trials, Compensation, and Jewish Assets
  2. pp. 323-324
  1. Scales of Justice: History, Testimony, and the Einsatzgruppen Trial at Nuremberg
  2. Hilary Earl
  3. pp. 325-351
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  1. Legitimating the Criminal State: Former Nazi Judges and the Distortion of Justice at the Frankfurt Auschwitz Trial, 1963–65
  2. Rebecca Wittmann
  3. pp. 352-372
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  1. German Compensation to Jewish Nazi Victims
  2. Constantin Goschler
  3. pp. 373-412
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  1. Compensation Cases and the Nazi Past: Deutsche Bank and Its Historical Legacy
  2. Jonathan Steinberg
  3. pp. 413-430
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  1. Holocaust-Era Assets: Globalization of the Issue
  2. Helen Junz
  3. pp. 431-446
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  1. VI. Confronting the Past
  2. pp. 447-448
  1. The Innocent Eye: Childlike, Childish, and Children’s Perspectives on The Holocaust
  2. Ian Buruma
  3. pp. 449-456
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  1. How and Why Did Holocaust Memory Come to the United States? A Response to Peter Novick’s Challenge
  2. Jeffrey Herf
  3. pp. 457-474
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  1. Facing the Holocaust in France, Belgium, and the Netherlands
  2. Pieter Lagrou
  3. pp. 475-486
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  1. Excusing the Holocaust: German Catholics and the Sensation of Cardinal Aloisius Muench’s “One World in Charity,” 1946–59
  2. Suzanne Brown-Fleming
  3. pp. 487-523
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  1. Germany’s Holocaust Memorial Problem--and Mine
  2. James E. Young
  3. pp. 524-542
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  1. Notes on Contributors
  2. pp. 543-547
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Additional Information

ISBN
9780810131170
Related ISBN
9780810119994
MARC Record
OCLC
551439862
Pages
582
Launched on MUSE
2016-01-01
Language
English
Open Access
No
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