Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

read more

Prologue: New York City, 1839

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xx

On April 10, 1839, Dr. J. S. Hurd, a New York City medical examiner, performed an autopsy on a man at William Garlick’s boardinghouse in lower Manhattan.¹ Garlick’s boardinghouse stood at 31 Washington Street, two streets east of...

read more

1. Cruel Beginnings (1798–1812)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-19

On the first page of A Son of the Forest, written when he was thirty-one, William Apess proudly claimed that he was a “descendant of one of the principal chiefs of the Pequod tribe, so well known in that part of American history called King Philip’s Wars.”¹ By 1800, the Pequots were a remnant...

read more

2. War, Wandering, and Home (1812–1829)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 20-43

The War of 1812 necessitated the recruitment of considerable soldiery, and it is not surprising that shortly after his arrival in New York Apess encountered a sergeant and a few of his men trying to convince volunteers to enlist to fight the British. They considered the young man a likely prospect...

read more

3. Interlude: A Methodist Life Composed (1829–1831)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 44-51

On July 25, 1829, the clerk of court for the Southern District of New York registered to William Apess the copyright for A Son of the Forest: The Experience of William Apes, A Native of the Forest. Comprising a Notice of the Pequod Tribe of Indians. Written by Himself. Inspired by his recent...

read more

4. Evangelist and Organizer (1831–1833)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 52-76

In the early summer of 1830, Apess was one of three preachers at a fundraiser for the Associated Methodist Church at the corner of Frankfort and William Streets in New York City, closing a bill that included William Summersides and Thomas Morris, representatives of the Primitive Methodist...

read more

5. The Mashpee Revolt (1833–1834)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 77-99

While he was preaching in Scituate and Kingston on the South Shore of Massachusetts, Apess heard conflicting accounts of the Mashpees’ situation. Some evidently were content with the government-appointed overseers’ protection of their tribal rights, while others vehemently opposed...

read more

6. King Philip’s Heir (1835–1836)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 100-119

With the path cleared for Mashpee’s incorporation as a state-recognized district if not quite yet a town, the tribe returned to normal business: cultivating the land; fishing in the ponds, rivers, and Nantucket Sound; and harvesting firewood. The group now numbered about five hundred and...

read more

7. Mashpee to Washington Street (1837–1839)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 120-133

The last three years of Apess’s life—from the time he left Mashpee until his death at forty-one in a boardinghouse in lower Manhattan—remain clouded. In 1836, he had recharged his career as a lecturer with his inflammatory eulogy on King Philip. Buoyed by the Mashpees’ success before...

read more

8. Living with “Color”

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 134-138

William Apess died a tragically early death. In all likelihood, he was laid to rest in an unmarked grave in New York’s Potter’s Field, at Forty-ninth Street and Fourth Avenue, then at the far northern edge of the city. His corpse may even have suffered the indignity of being exhumed in the...

read more

Epilogue

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 139-140

For a century and a half, William Apess virtually dropped from American history. Unlike, say, in the case of the pioneering feminist Margaret Fuller, whose premature death by drowning similarly robbed the nation of one of its most important voices...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 141-168

Select Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 169-174

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 175-176

Memory is a crafty grand master, often not revealing the logic of its moves until near the endgame. So it was in the case of this book, for it was not until I had almost completed it that I realized fully why I came to write it and understood more what it means to me. In 1977, as a young professor at the University of Colorado at Boulder...

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 177-190