Cover

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Frontmatter

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Contents

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p. v

Figures

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p. vii

Tables

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p. ix

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Preface

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pp. xi-xii

Large numbers of heretofore unpublished manuscripts in indigenous languages of southern Mexico and northern Central America are held in libraries and other repositories outside of the region known as Mesoamerica. In the United States, for example, sizeable manuscript collections are held at Harvard University, Indiana University, Princeton University, Tulane University, and University of Pennsylvania, among others. Taken as a whole, this material has largely been ignored, mostly ...

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1: Three K’iche’an Divinatory Calendars

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pp. 1-17

The three divinatory calendars presented in this volume are examples of a K’iche’an1 literary tradition that includes the Popol Vuh, Annals of the Cakchiquels (Memorial de Solola), and the Titles of the Lords of Totonicapan. Two of the calendars were written in indigenous Kaqchikel or K’iche’ languages, but in European script, sometime before or during the eighteenth century. The third example was written in K’iche’ and Spanish in 1854. ...

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2: Calendario de los indios de Guatemala, 1685

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pp. 18-63

An important volume comprising transcriptions of two original documents is curated in the collections of the library at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. These manuscripts are identified as “Calendario de los indios de Guatemala 1685. Kaqchikel” and “Calendario de los indios de Guatemala 1722. Kiche.” Both transcriptions were prepared in Guatemala City between 1875 and 1878 by the German philologist Carl Hermann Berendt. Daniel ...

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3: Calendario de los indios de Guatemala, 1722

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pp. 64-135

The second manuscript, “Calendario de los indios de Guatemala 1722. Kiche,” was written in K’iche’ in 1722 and was copied by Karl Hermann Berendt in 1877 from a manuscript in the Museo Nacional de Guatemala. Berendt believed that the calendar came from the Quetzaltenango area and that it was the one given to Cortés y Larraz by the resident priest (Carmack 1973:166). ...

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4: Calendario de Vicente Hern

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pp. 136-161

In 1854, the German physician Karl Scherzer visited Santa Catarina Ixtahuacan, hoping the community had preserved much of its traditional culture because of its isolated location. The resident priest, Fray Vicente Hernández Spina, prepared an informative document of K’iche’ religion and language in anticipation of Scherzer’s visit. It included a general account of the religious concepts of the Ixtahuacanos, their calendar day names, an explanation of how the calendar worked, a recorded ...

Appendix one: Notes on Highland Maya Calendars

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pp. 162-175

Appendix two: Notes on the Correlation of Maya and Gregorian Calendars

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pp. 176-184

Appendix three: Agricultural Cycle and the K’iche’an Calendar

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pp. 185-193

Notes

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pp. 194-210

References

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pp. 211-217

Index

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pp. 218-221