Title Page, Frontispiece, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Introduction

Harold Holzer, Craig L. Symonds, and Frank J. Williams

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pp. 1-3

He is both ubiquitous and enigmatic. He is as familiar as the penny and the five-dollar bill: at once instantly recognizable—yet he is elusive as a chimera. The historical Lincoln, the literary Lincoln, even the cinematic Lincoln, have all proved both fascinating...

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Lincoln’s Role in the 1860 Presidential Campaign

William C. Harris

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pp. 4-17

May 18, 1860, was one of the longest days in the life of Abraham Lincoln. On that day, Lincoln waited at Springfield for telegraphic reports from Chicago, where delegates to the national Republican convention would be nominating the party’s candidate...

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The Baltimore Plot—Fact or Fiction?

Michael J. Kline

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pp. 18-35

After more than a century and a half, the question remains: was the Baltimore Plot real or not? As most people familiar with Lincoln lore know, the Baltimore Plot was a suspected conspiracy to assassinate president-elect Abraham Lincoln in Baltimore as...

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The Old Army and the Seeds of Change

John F. Marszalek

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pp. 36-48

When the Civil War erupted at Fort Sumter in April 1861, Americans could hardly believe what was happening. Though conflict had been in the air for a decade, many Northerners thought the South was bluffing, and the South thought, as one Southerner...

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Seward and Lincoln: A Second Look

Walter Stahr

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pp. 49-65

William Henry Seward lived a long and eventful life: he was a leading lawyer, a state legislator, the governor of New York, federal senator for twelve years, secretary of state for eight years. This chapter, however, will focus on Seward’s relationship with Abraham...

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Mourning in America: Death Comes to the Civil War White Houses

Catherine Clinton

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pp. 66-87

When she entered the Executive Mansion, her new home, it was with a great deal of trepidation. Her husband’s elevation to the presidency had followed years of struggle but was a well-deserved triumph, which she savored. She had served him as a political...

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Abraham Lincoln, Admiral-in-Chief

Craig L. Symonds

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pp. 88-106

In considering the genius of Abraham Lincoln, the context in which we might use the word “genius” is what the Oxford English Dictionary lists as the fourth meaning of that word: “A natural ability or tendency which fits a person for a particular activity...

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Jefferson Davis and Robert E. Lee: Reluctant “Traitors”

William C. Davis

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pp. 107-122

The epithet “traitor,” when applied to anyone who sided with the Confederacy, can get a speaker or writer in big trouble, fast. As sensitive as it was to the men of the Confederacy themselves, it seems to be even more inflammatory among the self-appointed...

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“The Battle Hymn of the Republic”: Origins, Influence, Legacies

John Stauffer

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pp. 123-145

“The Battle Hymn of the Republic” is America’s unofficial anthem. You all know the song, but what you might not know is that the “Battle Hymn” is far more popular today than it was during the Civil War, beloved by Northerners and Southerners, conservatives...

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The Emancipation of Abraham Lincoln

Eric Foner

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pp. 146-162

Abraham Lincoln is the most iconic figure in American history. He exerts a unique hold on our historical imagination as an embodiment of core American ideals and myths—the self-made man, the frontier hero, the liberator of the slaves. Thousands of works...

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Lincoln and the Struggle to End Slavery

Richard Striner

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pp. 163-175

For a very long time, Americans have thought about Abraham Lincoln as a patriot above all else. Many see him as a quintessential “moderate”—a man who rescued our polity and saved our most precious institutions...

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Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation: A Propaganda Tool for the Enemy?

Amanda Foreman

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pp. 176-186

It is well known how much controversy surrounded President Lincoln’s Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation after the battle of Antietam. Who can forget the words of John Hughes, archbishop of New York, who warned: “We Catholics . . . have not...

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The Gettysburg Campaign and the New York City Draft Riots: Conspiracy or Coincidence?

Barnet Schecter

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pp. 187-198

The volcanic force and fury of the riots that erupted in New York City on July 13–17, 1863, can be explained only in part by the first federal conscription law in U.S. history, signed by President Abraham Lincoln on March 5—a law that exempted any man...

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Lincoln and New York: A Fraught Relationship

Harold Holzer

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pp. 199-213

Throughout his presidency, Abraham Lincoln had a complex and curiously conflicted relationship with the nation’s largest city and its largest state. Lincoln, of course, was an essentially western man—from Illinois by way of Kentucky and Indiana—but...

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Lincoln and McClellan: A Reappraisal

John C. Waugh

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pp. 214-227

George B. McClellan was a charming man, a brilliant man, a courageous soldier, a military comet. However, as scores of historians have delighted in pointing out, he bore a fatal flaw, and that was his unbridled hubris. McClellan was what the British...

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Judging Lincoln as Judge

Frank J. Williams

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pp. 228-236

While scholars, historians, and students have analyzed nearly every aspect of our sixteenth president’s life, including his childhood, his years as a lawyer, his too-short term as president and commander-in-chief, and, of course, his assassination, relatively little...

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The Madness of Mary Lincoln: A New Examination Based on the Discovery of Her Lost Insanity Letters

Jason Emerson

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pp. 237-244

In August 1875, after having lived at Bellevue Place Sanitarium for more than two months, placed there by her oldest son, Robert, and declared insane by a Chicago jury, Mary Lincoln wrote to her friend Myra Bradwell...

Notes

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pp. 245-278

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Contributors

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pp. 279-282

Harold Holzer is Roger Hertog Fellow at the New-York Historical Society and one of the nation’s leading authorities on Lincoln and the political culture of the Civil War era. He is chairman of the Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Foundation and has written, co-written...

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The Lincoln Forum: A History

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pp. 283-286

The Lincoln Forum—now in its twentieth year—was formed when several historians and students of Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War met in Florida during one of Robert Maher’s legendary Civil War Education Association conferences. Among those...

Index

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pp. 287-293

The North’s Civil War

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pp. 294-296