Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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Acknowledgments

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p. vii

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Introduction

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pp. ix-xlvi

The heroine of Frances Brooke's The Excursion (1777) comes to London with a novel, an epic poem, and a tragedy, which she believes the guarantee of her fame and economic security. Brooke herself may not have arrived in London in 1748 with her luggage stuffed with manuscripts, but before she...

Chronology

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pp. xlvii-xlix

Note on the Text

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p. li

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Preface to the Second Edition

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pp. 1-2

"I appeal to the people," was the celebrated form in which a citizen of J. ancient Rome refused his acquiescence in any sentence of which he felt the injustice.
On giving a new edition of The Excursion to the public, I find myself irresistibly impelled to use the same form of appeal from...

The Excursion: First Edition

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Book I

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pp. 5-16

On a mild evening in September last, as the two nieces of Col. Dormer, a gentleman of small fortune, in Rutland,1 were leaning over the terrace wall of their uncle's garden, admiring the radiant lustre of the setting sun, the mixed gold and azure which played on a rustic temple belonging...

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Book II

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pp. 17-31

I know not which, of two very common errors, most merits reprehension, the thoughtless passion of young ladies in the country to see London, or the short-sighted wisdom of their papas and mammas, such I mean whose situations give them the power to comply, in neglecting...

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Book III

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pp. 32-51

It was one of those clear frosty mornings in January*, which make us often forget the season, the blue serene almost rivaling the brightest tints of a summer sky, when Col. Dormer and Louisa, impatient to hear from their dear wanderer, drove, as soon as they had breakfasted...

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Book IV

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pp. 52-72

F) oor Maria! This journey was a stroke she did not expect. How give wings to the lazy-footed time? How pass the tedious hours of Lord Melvile's absence from London?
Lady Hardy came in, laughed at her gravity, and, though with great difficulty, seduced...

The Excursion: Volume The Second

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Book V

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pp. 75-93

If Miss Villiers was elated with the sudden return of her noble lover, a return which she, with great appearance of probability, attributed to the excess of his affection, and his inability to live longer absent from her; she was still more so on receiving from him the next morning a letter...

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Book VI

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pp. 94-109

When Miss Villiers rose in the morning, she found Mrs. Merrick in her W dining-room waiting her coming, in order to attend herself, as she sometimes did, during breakfast.
The grave air of this good woman alarmed her; she enquired, with the utmost...

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Book VII

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pp. 110-122

Miss Villiers expected Lord Claremont's visit with an impatience which will easily be imagined; but an impatience mixed with the most alarming apprehensions.
He might not see her with the same eyes as his son...

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Book VIII

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pp. 123-154

If Mr. Hammond's wheels had been as rapid as his ideas, he would have reached Belfont (for thither he bent his course) with the velocity of a spirit.
He arrived at this abode of tranquillity about twelve on Monday morning, and found Col. Dormer hanging with...

Notes to the Novel

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pp. 155-170

Revisions Made in the Second Edition

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pp. 171-178

Selected Bibliography

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pp. 179-182