Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-viii

Isobel Grundy, the general editor of the series of which this edition is a part, and Jan Fergus, a member of the edition's board, carefully reviewed this manuscript and made a number of valuable corrections and suggestions. Despite the increasing helpfulness of such databases as the Eighteenth-Century...

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Introduction

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pp. ix-xlii

Sarah Robinson Scott was born to many advantages of education and upbringing that made her a writer, but if she had not needed the money, she would scarcely have turned out the nine books (at least) that made her a professional author.
In 1712 her father, Matthew Robinson...

Chronology

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pp. xliii-xlvi

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Note on the Text

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pp. xlvii-xlviii

T he text reprinted here is that of the first edition, published by Millar in 1766. Preparation and proofreading of the novel were not executed by the original printer with the greatest of care. I have silently corrected obvious printer's errors and attempted to standardize inconsistent spelling and use of...

The History of Sir George Ellison

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Preface

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pp. 3-4

The usual intention of a preface, I apprehend, is to make the Author's apology; and yet I question whether he might not have a better chance of extenuating his fault (if he has committed one) by abridging his book than by adding to its length.
The doubt I am in as to this particular, will make me...

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Book I

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pp. 5-52

Sir George Ellison's father was the younger son of an ancient and opulent family; but receiving only that small proportion of his father's wealth, which, according to the custom of this country, usually falls to the share of a younger child, his posterity had little chance of inheriting any considerable...

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Book II

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pp. 53-100

Mr. Blackburn was much delighted with his new neighbour. His understanding, and elegance of manners, polished more by humanity than by mixing in the great world, were far superior to any thing he had seen in that countty. Mr. Ellison was peculiarly happy in having his virtues uncommonly...

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Book III

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pp. 101-163

While Mr. Ellison remained at Millenium Hall, he made frequent visits to the two societies,ยน composed of the persons those ladies had removed from a state of mortifying dependence; and received great pleasure from seeing their happiness. Observing to them one day how complete their...

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Book IV

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pp. 164-222

The first opportunity Mr. Ellison had of entertaining Miss Almon alone, he asked her, 'If she had any objection to going to Jamaica, where he had a sister-in-law, under whose protection she would be safe; for between the real danger, and her perhaps too strong apprehensions of being known, she...

Notes to the Novel

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pp. 223-232

Bibliography

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pp. 233-235