Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. i-vi

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

Illustrations

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-x

read more

Foreword

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xiv

About two out of every three museums in the United States are grounded in some form of history—national history, local history, and/or individual history. House museums make up a large proportion of these history museums. Some of these places have interpretive messages that can have a much greater impact on the public than any single history textbook. These...

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xv-xvi

This book is the result of a team effort by administrators, archaeologists, historians, and staff members who most of the time did not know they were working together. I would like to take the opportunity to recognize their roles in enabling the black history of Mount Clare to be told.
Thank you to Mary Corbin Sies, Julia A. King, Cheryl J. LaRoche, Paul A. Shackel, and Psyche Williams-Forson for reviewing earlier versions of this book and providing such terrific feedback....

List of Abbreviations

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xvii-xviii

read more

1. Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-20

Black history at historic plantations concerns more than slavery and freedom; it also tells the story of why blacks in the past are omitted at places with so much of their history to tell. Historic plantations offer rich laboratories in which to examine the ways that racism changes and stays the same through the circumstances that enable black history to be revealed or hidden. Mount Clare in Baltimore, Maryland, offers a case study of what...

read more

2. Slavery and Iron at Georgia

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 21-43

A starting point for equal access to black heritage is Georgia’s origin story. Reintegrating the history of the ironworks to include blacks reshapes the traditional perception of Dr. Charles Carroll, who established slavery on his Baltimore-area properties by the early 1730s. It challenges the myth that colonial elites developed empires on their own; instead, blacks were the foundation upon which the Carrolls depended. On a larger scale, black...

read more

3. The Creation of Mount Clare

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 44-71

After Charles Carroll the Barrister inherited his father’s estate, he set into motion a vision he had for a showpiece plantation at Georgia. Mount Clare, as the property became known, further became a place where the Carrolls reinforced racism and social inequality to support their own status and privilege. Within the mansion and in its vicinity, however, enslaved blacks and hired or elite whites interacted on a near-constant basis as the everyday...

read more

4. Slavery and Revolution

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 72-87

During the Revolutionary era, Charles Carroll the Barrister aimed to preserve the existing social order, an attitude reflected in his continuation of slavery at Mount Clare. Plantations like Mount Clare demonstrate the ways in which Revolutionary thought did or did not manifest in everyday life for enslaved persons. During the Revolutionary era, the thirteen colonies overthrew Great Britain to become a self-governing republic. Colonial...

read more

5. White Widowhood

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 88-114

After Charles’s death, Margaret chose to live at Mount Clare rather than at their Annapolis house. Although few of Margaret’s records and letters remain from her years as a widow, many more sources of historical information from this period are available than previously were about the people enslaved at Mount Clare, especially through government records. Government...

read more

6. Manumission and Freedom

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 115-144

Margaret Tilghman Carroll died at Mount Clare on March 14, 1817, at age seventy-six. Her death brought about major changes for the forty-nine people she enslaved. Some were sold while others were freed, but none were kept at Mount Clare or The Caves any longer. Following what happened to them next in slavery and freedom shows the range of experiences that enslaved blacks might encounter after a slaveholder’s death. Their stories...

read more

7. A Broader History

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 145-164

Perhaps the one common thread at Mount Clare between 1817, when Margaret Tilghman passed away, and 1987, when the museum became more professional, was the way in which the site addressed broader issues regarding race and inequality. The Mount Clare of 1987 would have been almost completely unrecognizable to its inhabitants of 1817. Many factors— changes in the property’s ownership and the landscape’s character,...

read more

8. Conclusion

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 165-174

In the first chapter, I mentioned that I see racist actions at Carroll Park where the Maryland Society or Carroll Park Foundation may not. Racism and racialized activities have not ended in United States, but many people are sensitive to being labeled racist, because their beliefs about themselves do not match up with the historical implications of the term. We—meaning, people of all colors and all backgrounds—are conscious of not wanting...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 175-200

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 201-212

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 213-217

About the Author, About the Series, Other Works in the Series

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 218-219