Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title page, Copyright Page

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. i-vi

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-x

In the course of this work, which has taken the better part of a decade, many archivists and librarians have aided me, but my thanks go particularly to the now retired Robert vV. Hill and his colleagues...

read more

Preface

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xiv

The contributions of Albert Shaw (1857-1947) to the progressive movement were substantial and dated from its very beginnings. Armed with a doctorate in history and political economy from...

read more

1. Buckeye and Hawkeye, 1857-1881

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-15

An Ohioan by birth, Albert Shaw remained conscious of his western background throughout his life. The theme of the West held a recurrent fascination for him. Although he recognized that...

read more

2. At the Johns Hopkins and Elsewhere, 1882-1884

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 16-29

The entries in Shaw's diary under January 5, 1882, are sparse and do nothing to indicate the anticipation with which he had looked forward to this day or the significance it would have for his...

read more

3. In Minneapolis and Abroad, 1884-1890

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 30-45

When Shaw arrived in Minneapolis in the summer of 1884 to resume his journalistic career, the city was in the midst of a phenomenal expansion that saw its population climb past 160,000 by the end...

read more

4. Dr. Shaw and His Review, 1891-1920

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 46-77

The Review of Reviews had been founded in London by the brilliant and erratic William T. Stead. A veteran journalist as well as a crusader for social reform and the "white man's burden," Stead was likely to rise to...

read more

5. The Ideal City, 1891-1900

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 78-98

Just as Shaw was establishing himself in New York, a new episode in the history of American reform was beginning. It was progressivism. Although its origins were modest, it was destined to attract...

read more

6. The Average Man

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 99-118

The Progressive era was a time of far-reaching economic change in which industrial trusts were being established with an unprecedented rapidity while organized labor was struggling for overdue benefits. Even farmers followed...

read more

7. Hand in Hand with T. R., 1901-1908

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 119-138

In 1942 Shaw began writing a book about his long-time friend Theodore Roosevelt. About three-fourths of the unfinished manuscript deals directly or by digression with Roosevelt, the mugwumps, and the...

read more

8. At Odds with Taft, 1909-1912

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 139-159

Albert Shaw had never considered himself a machine Republican. Although he regularly supported the party's national tickets and fundamental policies, he rarely hesitated to de· nounce a state or...

read more

9. Return to Republicanism, 1913-1920

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 160-177

In 1913 Albert Shaw and Woodrow Wilson were no longer as close as they had been during their stay at the Johns Hopkins and during the decade or so thereafter, but they were still on cordial terms. Taking a personal and...

read more

10. Guardian of American Values, 1916-1937

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 178-194

In the midst of the 1916 campaign, Congress, pressed by President Wilson to avert a threatened nationwide rail strike, enacted the Adamson Act, a law providing for a mandatory...

read more

11. A Sabbatical at Last, 1937-1947

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 195-210

The demise of Shaw's magazine was not a sudden or, as an obituary might have put it, unexpected event, but simply the passing of an elderly invalid. The end had been almost two decades in arriving...

Appendix: Circulation Data for the Review of Reviews

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 211-212

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 213-228

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 229-237