Cover

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Title Page Copyright Page

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Preface

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pp. ix-x

In selecting the novelists I write about, I have been helped greatly by my English friends L. P. Hartley, Walter Allen, Lord and Lady Snow, and John and Veronica Kilgour. I am indebted also to Ivy Compton-Burnett and...

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Introduction

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pp. xi-xii

Since neither I nor anyone else has read more than a small fraction of English novels published since World War I, it is with hesitance that I say the novelists I write about in this book represent...

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Chapter One: The Trauma

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pp. 1-9

The last year of an age golden enough to make us think it so opened quietly. The London Times for January 1, 1914, talked about the extreme cold, editorialized against pessimism, carried a leader in its literary...

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Chapter Two: Rose Macaulay: A Christian a Little Agnostic

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pp. 10-30

When Rose Macauley first came to London (she tells us in the London Magazine for March 1957), it was from her home in Italy, where she spent most of her early childhood with her "never at all respectable" parents. Much of her

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Chapter Three: Aldous Huxley: Sceptical Mystic

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pp. 31-50

It is tempting to suggest that Aldous Huxley felt the impact of World vVar I more than the disenchanted combatants. Kept from participation by bad eyesight and perhaps, like his character Richard Greenow, a conscientious...

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Chapter Four: Ivy Compton-Burnett: Factualist

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pp. 51-71

Though it was diffidently subtitled "A Study" when it first appeared, Ivy Compton-Burnett's first characteristic novel, Pastors and Masters ( 1925) reveals in small the attitudes, preoccupations, and techniques she has modified...

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Chapter Five: Evelyn Waugh: Catholic Aristocrat

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pp. 72-92

In the closing pages of Decline and Fall, Professor Otto Silenus, the architect who thinks the problem of architecture is "the problem of all art-the elimination...

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Chapter Six: Mid-View: The 1930s

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pp. 93-96

The first World War, Stephen Spender wrote, "had knocked the ball-room floor from under ... English life. People resembled dancers suspended in mid-air yet miraculously able to pretend that they were still...

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Chapter Seven: Graham Greene: Stoical Catholic

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pp. 97-123

In his essay about Dickens in he Lost Childhood (1951), Graham Greene remarks that he is "inclined to believe" that "the creative writer perceives his world once and for all in childhood and adolescence, and...

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Chapter Eight: Joyce Cary: Christian Unclassified

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pp. 124-151

Much as he might have disagreed with him in other ways, Joyce Cary would have agreed with Graham Greene's conviction that childhood and adolescence are fundamental in determining "the private world" the writer...

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Chapter Nine: L. P. Hartley: Diffident Christian

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pp. 152-167

In a symposium about the "new novelists" in The London Magazine ( 1958), L. P. Hartley was ranked among "the best" of them by three of the four contributors. Since Hartley was in his mid-sixties it is slightly strange...

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Chapter Ten: C. P. Snow: The Scientific Humanist

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pp. 168-190

Of all the novelists I have discussed so far, Lord Charles Snow (who prefers to be called C. P. Snow) is the most traditional contemporary British novelist with...

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Chapter Eleven: War, Cold

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pp. 191-198

The trauma ended; its effects did not. In the twenties writers and readers alike (of course I allow for many exceptions) were bitter and disenchanted because the tea was no longer there at Grantchester, because neither...

Index

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pp. 199-203