Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright Page

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. i-iv

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. v-viii

read more

PREFACE

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-x

Theater is known to have existed on the Iberian peninsula since its first settlers and invaders arrived. Its origin and development are difficult to determine, but the cradle of Spanish theater is considered to have been in Sagunto, where the Roman ruins of a theater...

read more

INTRODUCTION

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-5

The Spanish Siglo de Oro (Golden Age)-almost two centuries of great cultural intensity-arose out of a rich historical background. A brief review of the origin and early history of the Spanish people provides a fuller understanding...

read more

CHAPTER I. The Birth and Development of Spanish National Drama

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 6-35

Although the Spanish verse drama - the comedia - came into existence toward the end of the sixteenth century, its origin as a great art form can be traced not only to the first part of that century, when the Spanish Renaissance influenced the direction...

read more

CHAPTER II. Lope de Vega and the Formation of the Comedia

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 36-81

In the last quarter of the sixteenth century two trends in Spanish theater became evident: the popular, represented by Lope de Rueda and Juan de Ia Cueva, and the classical, headed by Cristobal de Virues, Lupercio Leonardo de Argensola, and...

read more

CHAPTER III. The Proliferation of the Comedia: Lope de Vega's Contemporaries

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 82-133

In the time of Lope de Vega, the public's passion for the theater made possible the unusual growth of the comedia. Their deeply infused attraction for theatrical entertainment, which was supported by...

read more

CHAPTER IV. Calderón: The Apogee of the Comedia

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 134-168

After Philip III became king in 1598, Spain entered an era of theatrical brilliance in which the prolific and original output of the great Spanish playwrights attained its greatest height. Lasting for thirty-seven years, this period of Spanish...

read more

CHAPTER V. The Decline: Calderón's Contemporaries and Imitators

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 169-186

The new generation of playwrights who were contemporaries of Calderon de Ia Barca continued in the tradition of court drama with even more refined forms and styles. In the midst of this intensely productive and heterogeneous...

read more

CHAPTER VI. The Comedia since 1700

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 187-199

The political and economic decline of Spain in the seventeenth century resulted from the exhaustion of the entire nation. Worn out by the long succession of wars it had waged in many parts of the globe, the nation finally lost its collective...

NOTES

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 200-217

SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 218-228

INDEX

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 229-246