Cover

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Title page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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Acknowledgments

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pp. viii-x

In doing research for this book in far-flung places, many persons facilitated my work by feeding and housing me: Daniel and Ruth-Christine Beveraggi in Paris; Joe and Christine Castle in New Orleans; Nat and Lottie Gilbert in Los Angeles; Rod and...

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Preface to the Second Edition

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p. xi

It gratifies me to see that this study has held up remarkably well in the decade since it was first published. The many controversial issues raised in the book- including such topics as African and Indian slavery in early Ste. Genevieve...

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Foreword

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pp. xii-xiv

For more than two centuries the little river town of Ste. Genevieve has exerted a special charm on visitors. Such diverse guests as Henry Brackenridge, Thomas Ashe, Mark Twain and even modern representatives of the generally unsentimental...

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Introduction

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pp. xv-xvii

Almost sixty years ago, I began collecting historical source materials pertaining to the colonial history of the Mississippi Valley. In addition to using documentary depositories and libraries in the United States, I traveled to Spain, Mexico, France...

Maps, Figures, and Illustrations

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pp. xviii-xx

Chronology of Events in the Illinois Country

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p. xxi

Part 1: Ste. Genevieve and The Illinois Country

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I. A Town Is Born

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pp. 2-25

The Illinois country, le pays des Illinois: this phrase was coined in the late seventeenth century to describe the center of North America. French Canadian traders, trappers, and missionaries, including Louis Jolliet and Father Jacques Marquette...

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II. The Old Town

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pp. 26-48

Who were the first colonists to settle on the west bank of the Mississippi in the Illinois Country, and what was the appearance of their village perched precariously upon the alluvial bank of the river? Captain Philip Pittman, who was...

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III. Competition for Empire

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pp. 49-85

Spain and Portugal provided the great explorers and colonizers of the sixteenth century. In the seventeenth century, northern European powers- Great Britain, France, and the Dutch Republic-also plunged into the enterprise of overseas...

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IV. Red Man-White Man

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pp. 86-124

Of the three principal ethnic groups that inhabited Upper Louisiana during the eighteenth century-white Europeans, black Africans, and red Indians--the last was the largest. A history of colonial Ste. Genevieve must deal with red men...

Part 2: Fundamentals of Life

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V. Earning a Living: Grain, Lead, and Commerce

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pp. 126-176

In 1746, shortly before the founding of the Old Town of Ste. Genevieve, someone in King Louis XV' s ministry of foreign affairs drafted a twenty-page "Memoir Concerning the Colony of Louisiana." Commenting upon the Illinois Country...

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VI. Society on the French Frontier

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pp. 177-195

The structure of society in colonial Ste. Genevieve was unique--it was not quite like that of any other European or colonial society in the eighteenth century. Metropolitan France had, until1789, a society of well-defined orders or estates based...

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VII. Black Slavery French Style

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pp. 196-238

When Frenchmen were establishing colonies in the New World, chattel slavery had, for all intents and purposes, disappeared from Western Europe. The renowned French jurist, Antoine Loisel, declared in 1608 that all Frenchmen were free...

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VIII. Life, Death, and Doctoring

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pp. 239-267

When Spanish soldiers arrived to take command of Upper Louisiana in the late 1760s, the Old Town of Ste. Genevieve was a mature community. It had been in existence for nearly two decades, and the population had...

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IX. Parent and Child

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pp. 268-283

IN 1744 an official in King Louis XV's foreign ministry drafted a memoir on French Louisiana and remarked that "the earth is very fertile, the climate salubrious, and the women fecund." The climate in the Mississippi Valley was not in fact all that...

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X. Daily Life in the Colonial Community

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pp. 284-333

Colonial Ste. Genevieve, whether Old Town or New Town, had a strongly rural flavor. Fernand Braudel has remarked about Early Modern European villages that "the towns urbanized the countryside, but the countryside 'ruralized...

Part 3: Community Organization

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XI. Town Government

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pp. 335-375

In the 1750s, during Ste. Genevieve's first decade of existence, there was virtually no local civil government, for the fledgling town on the west bank of the Mississippi continued to be administered as an adjunct to the French colonial communities on the...

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XII. Priests and Parishioners: The Catholic Church in Ste. Genevieve

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pp. 376-412

No traveler who huns off U.S. Highway 61 and descends into contemporary Ste. Genevieve via the Old Plank Road can fail to be impressed by the looming presence of the Roman Catholic Church. The two most imposing edifices in town...

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XIII. The New Towns: Nouvelle Ste. Genevieve and Nouvelle Bourbon

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pp. 413-455

Life in Ste. Genevieve is no longer continuously influenced by the presence of the Mississippi River. Levees have largely tamed the destructive forces of the river, and commodities and people now move into and out of Ste. Genevieve via roads...

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XIV. Conclusion: Changing Times

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pp. 456-472

It is common historical knowledge that modern Western civilization is a product of a long period of gestation going back to the ancient and medieval worlds, and that certain catalytic developments during the Early Modern Period...

Appendixes

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pp. 473-476

Bibliography

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pp. 477-500

Index

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pp. 501-519

Back Cover

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