Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. v-vi

read more

Preface

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-x

Much can be learned about combat from studying the thirty-eight months of fighting in Korea from June 1950 to July 1953. Military operations ranged from rapid advances and withdrawals and amphibious landings and evacuations, all reminiscent of World War II...

read more

Note on Maps

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xiii

A number of the maps used in this work were rough sketches drawn by soldiers as they recounted their experiences during the Korean War. As such, the maps employ a variety of symbols for terrain and military operations. To ensure clarity, notations have been added to...

List of Abbreviations

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xiv-xvi

read more

1. War Comes to Korea: The First Six Months

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-39

In the predawn darkness of Sunday, 25 June 1950, North Korean artillery and mortar shells began to fall on scattered South Korean army positions along the 38th parallel. Violence was no stranger to the area dividing North and South Korea. Artillery bombardments...

read more

2. Retreat to Wonju: 2d Infantry Division, 1-6 January 1951

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 40-57

The Chinese New Year's Offensive pushed the U.S. I and IX Corps south of the Han River, forcing the abandonment once again of Seoul. In the mountainous center, rejuvenated North Korean divisions attacked the ROK II and III Corps. General Ridgway believed...

read more

3. Action at Wonju: 23d and 38th Infantry Regiments, 6-7 January 1951

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 58-77

Arriving at Wonju on 6 January, the three battalions of the 23d Infantry Regiment and the French Battalion (attached) sent out patrols to contact an ROK division, which was supposed to tie in with the left flank of the 2d Infantry Division; these patrols, some operating...

read more

4. Return to Wonju: 2d Infantry Division, 8-20 January 1951

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 78-117

General Almond, X Corps commander, directed the 2d Division immediately to reoccupy Wonju. General McClure, the Id Division commander, argued that the terrain around Wonju made defense of that area difficult and that a much better defense line could be established...

read more

5. Hill 312: 1st Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 28-30 January 1951

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 118-140

While X Corps battled the North Koreans in the central sector in mid-January, the I and IX Corps on the west probed forward of their defensive positions on Line D in search of the Chinese, who had not closely followed the UN forces in their withdrawal south of...

read more

6. Twin Tunnels: 3d Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, and French Battalion, 30 January-2 February 1951

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 141-160

The 23d Infantry Regiment, with its attached French Battalion, occupied the western end of the X Corps defensive line, tying in with the right flank unit of IX Corps at Yoju. In response to orders from Eighth Army to maintain contact with the reconnaissance in...

read more

7. Operation Roundup: Supporting the ROK Troops

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 161-183

The strong attack on units of the 23d Infantry Regiment south of Chip'yong-ni in the Twin Tunnels area confirmed intelligence reports of a large Chinese buildup between Chip'yong-ni and Hongch'on. From this area the enemy could launch an offensive either south into...

read more

8. Operation Roundup: Escaping the Trap

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 184-220

The collapse of the ROK 8th Division and the ROK 3d Division to the east placed their American support units in extreme peril. The enemy rapidly moved south to block the escape of Support Teams A and B and Support Forces 7 and 21. Successful withdrawal depended...

read more

9. Holding the Chinese: Chip'yong-ni and Wonju

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 221-258

On 13 February, as the remnants of Support Forces 7 and 21, along with the 38th Infantry Regiment, reached the new defensive line above Wonju, the Chinese closed in on the 23d Infantry Regiment at the key crossroads of Chip'yong-ni. Because the 23d Infantry...

read more

10. The Relief of Chip'yong-ni: Task Force Crombez

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 259-287

MAJ. ROBERT A. HUMPHREY, S-2 OF THE 5TH CAVALRY: One platoon of Company A, 70th Tank Battalion, was with each infantry battalion, as well as one platoon from Company A, 8th Engineer Combat Battalion. The 61st Field Artillery Battalion (105mm howitzers...

read more

Conclusion

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 288-292

The contrast between the situation in Korea in late December 1950 and that which existed two months later is striking. When General Ridgway arrived to take command, it was unclear whether UN forces would be able to remain on the peninsula. Ridgway quickly...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 293-303

read more

Bibliographical Essay

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 304-306

This work is based primarily on interviews conducted by U.S. Army military historians during the Korean War. Copies of the interviews are held by the U.S. Army Center of Military History at Fort McNair in Washington, D.C. Other primary sources supplement the interviews...

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 307-324

Photo Gallery

pdf iconDownload PDF