Cover

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Title Page, Copyright Page

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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p. v

List of Illustrations

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p. vi

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Preface

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pp. vii-viii

The Injur'd Husband and Lasselia have never before been edited, and they are only rarely even mentioned in studies of early English fiction. Their obscurity requires that they be placed in context for the modern reader. The introduction to this edition seeks...

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Introduction

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pp. ix-xxxviii

The facts of Eliza Haywood's life, and to some extent those of her career, have always been frustratingly elusive for a writer so prolific and so popular as she was, and their elusiveness has caused nearly everyone who has attempted to chronicle them to fall into...

Chronology

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pp. xxxix-xlii

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Note on the Texts

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pp. xliii-xliv

The texts reprinted here are from the Boston Public Library copy of the first edition of The Injur'd Husband (December 1722; dated 1723), and from the Yale University Library copy of the first edition of Lasselia (October 1723; dated 1724). Haywood made no substantive changes...

The Injur'd Husband

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PREFACE.

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pp. 2-3

Troubling the Reader with any Thing of this Kind, is generally so little to the Purpose, that I have often thought the Authors made Use of such Introductions more to swell the Bulk of their Book, than any other Reason: And how sensible soever I am of the many Faults...

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To THE RIGHT HONOURABLE THELADY HOW

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p. 4

Deedications are become so scandalous of late, that, if Modesty were not a Virtue too little fashionable, both the Patron and Writer wou'd be out of Countenance: The Reason of this is evident; the Press is set to work only to gratifie a mercenary...

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THE INJUR'D HUSBAND; OR, THE Mistaken Resentment. A NOVEL

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pp. 5-102

The Vicissitude of all human Affairs is so absolutely necessary to give Mankind a true Notion of themselves, that he who seems most fix'd in Happiness, and fenc'd from every Blast of adverse Fate, sooner or later, is generally led by some unavoidable Impulse to quit his Haven...

Lasselia

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To THERIGHT HONOURABLE THEEARL OF SUFFOLK ANDBlNDON.

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pp. 105-106

When I presume to entreat your Protection of a Trifle such as this, I do more to express my Sense of your unbounded Goodness, than if I were to publish Folio's in your Praise. A Great and learned Work honours the Patron who accepts it, but little Performances stand in need of....

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LASSELIA: OR,THE SELF-ABANDON'D. A NOVEL

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pp. 107-150

Never was a Court more resplendent with Beautys, than that of France, in the Reign of their late Monarch Lewis XIV.5 That Prince, in spite of his Ambition, found room for Love, nor could the incessant Hurry of his other Affairs deprive him of the...

Notes to the Novels

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pp. 151-158

Select Bibliography

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pp. 159-164