Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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p. v

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Preface

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pp. vii-viii

My six-year-old son Ido is a very inquisitive boy. Recently, he became obsessed with studying the map of the world. Every morning he would wake me up with curious questions: “Are we ‘in peace’ with Egypt?” “Are we ‘in peace’ with France?” “Are we ‘in peace’ with Japan?” “Are we ‘in peace’ with Australia?” “Are we ‘in peace’ with Lebanon?” and so on.1 After a week of early reveilles...

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1. Beyond Commercial Liberalism: Conceptualizing the Political Economy of Transitions to Peace

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pp. 1-32

Since the end of the cold war, there has been growing interest in the links between economics and security. The literature dealing with these links has focused on three issues: the links between economic interdependence and conflict, economic statecraft (most notably the use of economic sanctions), and the broadening of the concept of security to include economic and social factors.1 Much...

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2. Shifting Priorities: Egypt and Israel’s Attempts at Peacemaking

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pp. 33-56

The signing of a peace treaty by Israeli prime minister Menachem Begin and Egyptian president Anwar Sadat on March 26, 1979, was truly a historic moment. After thirty years during which the Arab world refused to accept the legitimate right of the state of Israel to exist and after three bloody wars, Egypt was the first Arab state to acknowledge Israel and sign a peace treaty with it. On...

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3. The Limits of Peacemaking from Above: Jordan and Israel’s Stalled Peace Process

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pp. 57-81

While the peace treaty between Jordan and Israel was signed only in October 1994, fifteen years after the treaty between Egypt and Israel, many felt that it had greater potential for generating a “warm peace.” Indeed, the history of relations between Jordan and Israel has included both enduring conflict and tacit strategic cooperation. Jordan fought against the new state of Israel in 1948...

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4. Postwar Relations in Southeast Asia: Japan, the Philippines, and Indonesia

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pp. 82-106

In a marked contrast to the two Middle Eastern cases presented in chapters 2 and 3, the transition to peace between Japan and the countries of Southeast Asia has been primarily a success story. Many international relations scholars tend to talk about Southeast Asia as a whole, especially since the successful development of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). This chapter...

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5. Government and Big Business: Normalizing Relations between Japan and South Korea

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pp. 107-132

Unlike the occupation of the Philippines and Indonesia, which lasted only three years, Japan’s occupation of Korea lasted from 1910 until 1945. It took twenty more years for a normalization treaty to be signed, in 1965. Even then, the treaty triggered massive domestic opposition in the Republic of Korea (hereafter ROK or South Korea). Economic relations between the two countries, however...

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6. The “Classic” Case in Perspective: France and Germany from War to Union

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pp. 133-159

Much of the theoretical literature on the logic of commercial liberalism, especially its early roots, either builds upon or is inspired by the Franco- German transition to peace after the end of World War II. One of the goals of this book was to move away from the Eurocentric bias of that literature by examining the role of economic factors in transitions to peace in other regions of...

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7. From Enemies to Partners: The Polish-German Transition to Peace

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pp. 160-183

The transformation of German-Polish relations since the end of World War II has been dramatic. Relations between these two countries have a history of bitterness dating back to the late eighteenth century, when Germans ruled over Poles. German rule may have brought technological progress, but it also crushed Polish insurrections and tried to “Germanize” Polish children.1 The...

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8. Politics, Economics, and Peace: Setting Realistic Expectations

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pp. 184-202

In the ongoing debate between proponents of commercial liberalism and realism over the role of economic logic in making peace with erstwhile enemies, we are likely to find instances that support either one of these approaches. There will be some cases in which economic factors are used to promote transitions to peace but are based on a political rather than liberal-economic logic as...

Notes

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pp. 203-234

Bibliography

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pp. 235-251

Index

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pp. 253-257