Cover

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Title page, Copyright, Dedication, Epithets

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pp. i-viii

Contents

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pp. ix-x

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xiv

A book is a collaborative endeavor, born in the mind and nurtured by readers, writers, scholars, editors, and communities of people, both living and dead.When the book is ready to face the world on its own, it is important for the author to thank those who have contributed to its growth. My first thanks go to the people...

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1. Introduction

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pp. 1-14

Winston Smith gave up too easily. In the same city where he found a man's memories to be only "a rubbish heap of details," I found a great deal more. My interviewees were conscious and intelligent witnesses to history Over countless cups of tea in sitting rooms, senior citizens' centers, churches, and synagogues, they shared...

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2. London Can Take It: Ideology and Wartime London

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pp. 15-33

In 1939 London was the largest city in the world, the world's busiest port, and the home of more than eight million people. Greater London consisted of many urban boroughs and two administratively designated "cities": the ancient city of London, consisting of one square mile and home to its financial district, and the adjacent city...

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3. Careless Talk Costs Lives: Speech in Wartime London

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pp. 34-79

In The Dark Lady of the Sonnets, George Bernard Shaw paints a delightful picture of the speech habits of Londoners: he shows the young Shakespeare walking around the city and writing down what people say. These notes become the dialogue of his plays; Shakespeare is depicted here as a great folk-poet, taking the living language...

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4. Time Long Past: Narratives of Wartime London

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pp. 80-124

Stories about wartime London are to this day an important component of British cultural and national identity. Told with relish to tourists, scholars, and bored or fascinated grandchildren, these stories are ways of keeping the past alive and of asserting one's own place in a crucial historical epoch. They are also the precious cultural...

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5. London Pride: Music and Wartime London

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pp. 125-174

Few art forms cover so broad a base as the one called music.1 Some arts, such as theater, are essentially communal, while others, such as literature, are in large measure solitary. Some are basically the province of amateurs, such as storytelling, while others are largely the domain of professionals, such as sculpture. Yet music encompasses...

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6. Present Tense: Memories of Wartime London

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pp. 175-204

Any study of the past is in some sense a study about memory. The past is gone irretrievably; but memories remain, providing us with information and yielding meaning about past events. Even historical sources apparently created "on the spot" are the creations of memory; a general's account, a newspaper report, and a descriptive...

Notes

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pp. 205-211

References

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pp. 212-221

Index

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pp. 222-230

Illustrations

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pp. 231-238