Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

TItle Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

CONTENTS

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. v

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

read more

PREFACE

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xii

“Hegel and Haiti” was something of an intellectual event when it appeared in Critical Inquiry in the summer of 2000. The essay’s unexpected movement through art catalogues, political journals, foreign translations, internet blogs, workers’ newspapers, and college classrooms was in response to the unconventional topologies of time ...

Part One: HEGEL AND HAITI

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 1

read more

INTRODUCTION TO PART ONE

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 3-20

“Hegel and Haiti” was written as a mystery story. The reader is encouraged to begin with it directly, before the introduction provided here. For those already familiar with the plot and its denouement, this new introduction (that can be read as the afterward as well) describes the process of discovery behind the essay and ...

read more

HEGEL AND HAITI

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 21-76

By the eighteenth century, slavery had become the root metaphor of Western political philosophy, connoting everything that was evil about power relations.1 Freedom, its conceptual antithesis, was considered by Enlightenment thinkers as the highest and universal political value. Yet this political metaphor began to take root ...

Part Two: Universal History

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 77

read more

INTRODUCTIONTO PART TWO: UNIVERSAL HISTORY

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 79-86

Today’s neoliberal hegemony sets the stage for “Universal History” that continues in the spirit of “Hegel and Haiti” to unearth certain repressions surrounding the historical origins of modernity. Present realities demand such historical remappings as an alternative to the fantasies of clashing civilizations and exclusionary ...

read more

UNIVERSAL HISTORY

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 87-152

Could slavery have taken root in the colonizing metropoles of Europe? The answer to this question was contested rather than assured. What made colonial slavery modern was its capitalist form, extracting maximum value by exhausting both land and labor to fill an insatiable consumer demand created by the addictive products ...

BIBLIOGRAPHY

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 153-164