Cover

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Title page, Copyright

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Contents

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Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-viii

I have incurred many debts preparing this edition, some of which I would like to acknowledge here. The University of Georgia awarded me a Senior Faculty Research Grant in support of this project, and further funds were provided by the College of Arts and Sciences. I am grateful, in particular, to Hugh Ruppersburg, Associate Dean...

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Introduction

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pp. ix-xxxii

When Charlotte Smith emerged on the literary scene in 1784 with the publication of her Elegiac Sonnets and Other Poems, she had long cultivated a talent for writing. Anecdotes from her school days tell of her composing at the age of ten a poem on the death of General Wolfe.1 And, by her own account, she was accustomed to beguiling...

Chronology

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pp. xxxiii-xxxv

Note on the Text

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p. xxxvi

The Young Philosopher

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pp. 1-2

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Volume I

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pp. 3-80

It is, I believe, in a work written by Mrs. Sarah Fielding, and now out of print, called "The Art of Tormenting," that I have read the following fable:
''A society of animals were once disputing on various modes of suffering, and of death; many offered their opinions, but it was at length agreed that the sheep, as the...

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Volume II

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pp. 81-158

The interest taken by Delmont in every thing that related to Glenmorris and his family, induced him to seize every occasion of hearing the particulars of their history. Mrs. Glenmorris, as solicitous on her part to be thoroughly understood, embraced the earliest opportuniry of relating to him the occurrences of her own and her husband's...

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Volume III

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pp. 159-240

Slowly and unwillingly as Delmont left the spot, where all his hopes of happiness were centered, he no sooner found himself a few miles from thence, than he proceeded with as much haste as if he expected to find happiness where he was going.
Nothing was to him so intolerable as suspence. He thought, though he had not...

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Volume IV

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pp. 241-354

Mr. Armitage, sending up a message that he was a stranger, who waited upon her about business, was admitted to Mrs. Crewkherne. Had he given his name to the servant, she would certainly have refused him an audience; she expressed herself very much surprised when he announced himself; for notwithstanding the virulence of her...

Notes to the Novel

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pp. 355-390

Variants

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pp. 391-394

Bibliography

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pp. 395-397