Cover

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Title page, Copyright

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Contents

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Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-viii

I would like to thank the following people for their assistance and support in preparing this edition: James Bowden; Anne Brennan of the Hibernian Genealogical Society; my colleagues on C18-L, the eighteenth-century discussion group; Douglas Chambers; Brian Corman; Frans De Bruyn; Antonia...

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Introduction

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pp. ix-xlvi

Mary Davys was born in about 167 4, in either Ireland or England. Her parentage, family name, and origins are all lost to us and she herself was not particularly helpful in establishing when and where and to whom she was born. In The Fugitive (1705) she suggests her origins may have been English...

Chronology

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pp. xlvii-xlviii

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Note on the Text

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pp. xlix-10

This present edition is built on the work of Mary Davys's previous twentieth-century editors, William H. McBurney, Robert Adams Day and Donald Hal Stefanson. Their pioneering scholarship, in both textual and background information, has provided me with an invaluable foundation from...

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The Reform'd Coquet; or Memoirs of Amoranda

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pp. 11-92

The most avaritious Scribbler that ever took Pen in hand, had doubtless a view to his Reputation, separate from his Interest. I confess myself a Lover of Money, and yet have the greatest Inclination to please my Readers; but how to do so, is a very critical Point, and what more correct Pens than...

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Familiar Letters Betwixt a Gentleman and a Lady

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pp. 93-122

It is now six whole Days since I left the pleasures of the Town, and the more agreeable Amusement of Berina's Company, for a lonely Retreat into the dull Country where Solitude indulges Melancholy, and Time, that used to fly, goes only a Foot-pace. Thought is now my only Companion, and it often diverts...

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The Accomplish'd Rake, or Modern Fine Gentleman

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pp. 123-226

THERE is a certain Ingredient in the Compound of a Dedication, call'd Adulation or Flattery, which is a Weed grown so rank by Age, that I am afraid it may offend your Nice Noses; and for that Reason, am resolved to pull it up by the Roots, tho' it is very possible some of ye may believe there is no such thing...

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Appendix: The Grub-Street Journal Letters

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pp. 227-230

The gentle usage with which you treat all your Members (except your Orator)² hath embolden'd me to address you in this manner, and forbids me to despair of receiving the decorum due to my Sex, as well as the respect due to me as a member. *My Plays, my Novels, my Wit (of which the young Students...

Notes on the Novels

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pp. 231-250

Bibliography

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pp. 251-253