Cover

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Title Page, Copyright Page

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-x

Writing history remains an individual effort, and I am responsible for the contents of this book. Yet the book would not exist without the contributions of a number of institutions and people. Among the institutions, I thank the National Endowment for...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-8

This is a book about the American antislavery movement, the nation's most important reform movement of the nineteenth century. The antislavery effort contributed to the coming of...

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1. The South in Antislavery History

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pp. 9-25

Now and then during the past century and a half historians have investigated the role of the border slave states in the development of the antislavery movement in nineteenth-century America. The subject is difficult to resist. In the tier of states stretching...

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2. An Image of a Southern White Emancipator

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pp. 26-44

In 1857 Hiram Foote was a twenty-five-year veteran in the antislavery cause. He had lectured against slavery in New York, Ohio, illinois, and Wisconsin. But to his mind none of his efforts measured up to...

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3. An Image of a Southern Black Liberator

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pp. 45-63

"Slaveholders have but one alternative, either to emancipate their slaves voluntarily, and thus escape the danger they dread, or have the slaves emancipate themselves by force," said the Reverend Amos A Phelps of Massachusetts in...

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4. John Brown's Forerunners

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pp. 64-83

"Seven of our citizens are now in southern prisons," the abolitionist editor of the Green Mountain Freeman observed in December 1844.1 The seven included two students and a carpenter from a school for missionaries in Illinois, two ministers from...

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5. Preaching an Abolitionist Gospel in the South

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pp. 84-106

As images of southern white emancipators, daring slave rescuers, and heroic slave rebels proliferated within northern abolitionist reform culture in the 1840s, evangelical and political abolitionists of diverse backgrounds began to...

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6. Antislavery Colonies in the Upper South

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pp. 107-126

In the spring of 1859 John C. Underwood wrote to Oliver Johnson of the Garrisonian National Anti-Slavery Standard to promote a "plan of Christian colonization of the border slave States by organized emigration." Underwood, a Republican, a former...

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7. The Intersectional Politics of Southern Abolitionism

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pp. 127-148

"I greatly rejoice at your visit to our state. The effect has been, and will continue to be most salutary," John G. Fee told George W. Julian ofIndiana in November 1852. Julian was the Free Soil vice presidential nominee that year, and by coming to...

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8. Legacies

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pp. 149-171

In 1877, sixty-one-year-old Calvin Fairbank served as the superintendent of the Moore Street Missionary Society of Richmond, Virginia, which provided an industrial education to Mrican Americans. Fairbank, who was remembered for...

Notes

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pp. 172-218

Bibliography

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pp. 219-236

Index

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pp. 237-245

Illustrations

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pp. 246-253