Cover

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Title Page, Copyright Page

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-viii

This book could not have been written without the cooperation of the following: Michael Cole; Irwin Danels; Samuel Gill, archivist, Margaret Herrick Library; the late John Hall, West Coast...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-11

On Monday 20 October 1947 at 10:30 A.M. in the packed Caucus Room of the Old House Office Building in Washington, D.C., amid the whirring of newsreel cameras and the popping of flashbulbs, the House Committee on Un-American Activities (HUAC) formally...

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1. Samuel Ornitz: Mazel Tov! to the World

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pp. 12-28

John Howard Lawson may have been the ideologue of the Ten, Herbert Biberman the organizer, and Ring Lardner, Jr., the wit; but Samuel Badisch Ornitz was the patriarch. Although Ornitz would have preferred...

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2. Lester Cole: Hollywood Red

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pp. 29-44

Lester Cole arrived in Hollywood about the same time as Samuel Ornitz, both receiving their first screenplay credits in 1932. Cole's Hollywood years are better documented because...

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3. John Howard Lawson: Hollywood Commissar

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pp. 45-69

John Howard Lawson came to Hollywood for the first time in 1928, shortly before Ornitz and Cole arrived. Unlike his comrades, however, Lawson had already built a reputation: five of his plays had been produced...

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4. Herbert Biberman: The Salt That Lost Its Savor

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pp. 70-81

While John Howard Lawson's plays are discussed in standard histories of the American drama, Herbert Biberman's contribution to the theater merits a mere paragraph in one of them.1 Yet Biberman might have become...

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5. Albert Maltz: Asking of Writers

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pp. 82-103

When Albert Maltz graduated from Columbia University in 1930 with a B.A. in philosophy, he had no intention of pursuing the intellectual life. His sights were set on the stage; accordingly, he enrolled...

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6. Alvah Bessie: The Eternal Brigadier

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pp. 104-120

Even the most militant supporters of the Ten would have to admit that Alvah Bessie's contribution to the American film-one original screen story and four scripts, all written from...

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7. Adrian Scott: A Decent Man

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pp. 121-134

Stage, the chic precursor of Theatre Arts, was "The Magazine of After-Dark Entertainment," as its cover proclaimed. Notables from the literary and performing arts such as Clifton Fadiman, Deems Taylor, Burgess Meredith, and...

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8. Edward Dmytryk: To Work, Perchance to Dream

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pp. 135-165

"My life has been one long roller-coaster ride. I've had more ups and downs than a two-bit whore in a lumber camp. And I've learned one thing. Every time fate beckons with...

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9. Ring Lardner, Jr.: Radical Wit

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pp. 166-182

The supreme moment in A Star Is Born (1937) occurs at the end of the film when Vicki Lester (Janet Gaynor) steps before a microphone and introduces herself by her married name: "Hello, everybody. This is Mrs. Norman...

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10. Dalton Trumbo: The Bull That Broke the Blacklist

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pp. 183-222

Although none of the Ten has ever become a household name, "Dalton Trumbo" at least comes close. When I was researching this book in Los Angeles in the summer of 1985, a waiter in a Westwood Hamburger Hamlet, sensing that...

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Epilogue

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pp. 223-229

It is a truism of American film history that the blacklist which followed the 1947 hearings contributed to the decline of the movie industry after World War II. There were other factors of course, the most significant being...

Chronologies, Bibliographies, and Filmographies

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pp. 230-247

Notes

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pp. 248-256

Index

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pp. 257-264

Illustrations

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pp. 265-272